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Serving the Present... Remembering the Past...
Air Force Weather

 

NEWSLETTER                      Vol. 12, No. 1 March 1998

Reunion info |Branson Tour|Other St Louis Attractions|Help AWA Grow|Advertisements needed|Forecast for Victory|AWS now AFWA|98 Mediterranean Cruise|AFWA Update|Did you know|Flying the Weather|In Memoriam|Satellite Launch|Unit & Association reunions|6th WS|Air Weather Recon. Assoc.|15 & 20th WS|17th WS|18th WS|21st WS|3349 TTS|Naval Weather Assoc.|Retired Old Weather Friends|Uncle Sam's Weather Bureau|Weather Parachutists Assoc.|30 Years ago - Vietnam|Letters to Editor|8th Air Force|1997 Award Winners|Kelly named NWS Director|More Member news|First Tornado Forecast|AWA Webmaster|Locator needs help

 

(The AWA annual Newsletter and Roster of members will be sent to all AWA members and Air Force Weather units by the end of March 1998. Bulk Rate mailing may cause it to be delayed into early April for some. This on-line newsletter has been reformatted from the paper copy to fit on the AWA home page and to provide easier reading on a computer screen.)

THE 24–28 JUNE 1998 AWA REUNION

PLAN TODAY to join other members, spouses and guests for an extremely memorable time at the Air Weather Association reunion to be held in Saint Louis, Missouri from 24–28 June 1998. The reunion headquarters will be at the HENRY VIII Hotel and Conference Center, 4690 North Lindbergh Blvd., Saint Louis, Missouri 63044. As of 28 February 1998, over 240 members have already reserved rooms or suites.

The HENRY VIII has single and double-bedded rooms and 2-room suites with separate bedrooms and parlors. The double-bedded rooms are now in very short supply. If need be, a block of rooms will be available at the Holiday Inn across the street to cover overflow requirements. The reservation agents at the HENRY VIII will inform callers about the overflow capabilities when necessary. The Holiday Inn is within walking distance, but shuttle service will be provided by the HENRY VIII Hotel vans.

The HENRY VIII has enough meeting space to accommodate our banquet and hospitality room needs. The hotel also has a large parking lot to serve hotel guests, RVs and the many AWA members living nearby who intend to drive back and forth from home to the reunion activities.

The AWA discount rate for a standard room at the Henry VIII hotel is $59 and when all taxes are included, the total will be $67.66 per night for a single/double/triple/quad (s/d/t/q) room. The rate for a two-room suite is $64 and when all taxes are included, the total will be $73.32 per night. Prices for the Holiday Inn overflow will probably be

$69 per night plus taxes.

Reserve a room or suite NOW by calling Henry VIII Hotel reservations at 1-800-325-1588 and mention AWA reunion. Reservation cut off date is 23 May 1998.

The Reunion Registration Form will be enclosed in the mailing of AWA Newsletter and Roster to all members at the end of March 1998. The Registration Form is also available on the AWA Home Page.

AWA SAINT LOUIS 1998 REUNION

WHEN: 24–28 June 1998

WHERE: HENRY VIII Hotel and Conference Center, 4690 North Lindbergh Boulevard, Saint Louis, Missouri 63044; 800-325-1588 or 314-731-3040

WHO: Air Weather Association Members, their spouses and their guests (guests cannot be eligible for membership).

WHY: Our biennial gathering to renew friendships and make new ones; remember the past; enjoy the present with banquets, hospitality receptions and tours in a great city; expecting this reunion to surpass our last reunion in Hampton, Virginia 1996.

WHAT: A low-cost reunion program at an excellent hotel with something for everyone, including separate unit/squadron get togethers. We offer the best in camaraderie and nostalgia for our members.

HOW MUCH: Just $70 buys hosted hospitality receptions for 4 days, a buffet dinner function on Friday, a banquet dinner/dance on Saturday evening and much, much more. A golf tournament, tours throughout Saint Louis, Riverboat gambling and other activities have been arranged at low group rates.

REUNION REGISTRATION

Enclosed in the annual mailing, you will find a yellow REGISTRATION form. Send that reunion registration form in early with full payment of fees to be eligible for the free hotel room drawing (it must be received by the 15th of May to be eligible). If you subsequently have to cancel, a very generous cancellation policy (see registration form) has been arranged by our volunteer reunion organizer. It does not pay to delay sending in your registration. NO ONE will be registered after 1 June or at the reunion. Registrations that arrive at the reunion organizer’s address postmarked after 1 June 1998 will be returned to the originators. (You may also use the registration form from the AWA Home Page.)

HOTEL RESERVATIONS

AWA REUNION HEADQUARTERS will be at the HENRY VIII HOTEL and Conference Center. See page 1 (top of the on-line newsltetter copy) for reservation information. NOTE: The HOTEL'S CUT-OFF DATE is 23 MAY 1998 for guaranteed reservations at the reunion discounted rates. (After 23 May, rooms may be available at reunion rates on a space-available basis.)In order to be certain of having a hotel room, you have to personally reserve a room with the HENRY VIII Hotel reservation agents AND the reunion organizer must receive your reunion registration form by 1 June 1998. Room reservations will be canceled for all those who have not registered for the reunion. In short, the hotel room block has been contracted for AWA reunion attendees only.

If additional rooms are required, the Holiday Inn across the street from the HENRY VIII will be used. You would be notified of that fact by the Henry VIII reservation staff when you call.

TRAVEL

All reunion attendees have to make their own travel arrangements to/from the reunion location. Airline rates for reunions weren’t less than regular advance-sale, senior, and other available discount rates. Please make travel arrangements early. Joe Tucker informed us that depending on your return plans you could have scheduling difficulties with early 4th of July vacation travelers.

AIRPORT PICKUP

The HENRY VIII Hotel and Conference Center provides 24-hour complimentary shuttle service to the Lambert-St. Louis International Airport. Please indicate on the back of the yellow Reunion Registration Form: your arrival airline; date/time; whether or not you will need to be picked up; and the number in your party. After arrival you can call the hotel for pick-up if the van is not at the airport already.

You may have to wait a short time at the airport if you have not provided your arrival information in advance or many attendees are arriving at the same time.

Please do not hold up sending in your registration form if you do not have firm arrival information early. You can always send in your airline information later.

AIRPORT DROP OFF after Reunion

At the Reunion Information Desk in the AWA hospitality room, you will be asked to sign up for transportation to the airport. You will need to provide your airline departure information at that time if you did not enter it on the Registration Form.

Attendees going on the bus to the follow-on Branson Tour will be dropped off at the airport on return if desired.

TRAVEL to/from REUNION ACTIVITIES

Tour buses are being contracted to carry reunion attendees between the HENRY VIII Hotel and the scheduled tour locations. Transportation for the Wednesday, 24 June 1998 golf tournament in Forest Park will be by available cars and vans. If you need special transportation requirements during any portion of the reunion, please indicate those requirements to the reunion organizer on the back of your Registration Form or on a separate note.

SEATING FOR REUNION MEAL FUNCTIONS:

Reserved seating by units/groups at round tables for 10 within the HENRY VIII Grand Ballroom for the Friday night buffet and Saturday night banquet will be on a first-come basis (determined by receipt of your registration form). The reunion committee will reserve tables based on preferences stated on the registration forms or as indicated to the committee at the reunion information desk at least one day before the meal function. Attendees when checking in at the AWA Reunion Information Desk at the hotel will be given place cards (one for Friday, another for Saturday). When the Ballroom doors open for dinner, attendees will use their place cards to claim their seats within the areas reserved for their group or in open seating areas.

FOOD SERVICES AVAILABLE

The HENRY VIII Hotel has full food service availability. The Hotel restaurants will give AWA reunion attendees (wearing their AWA name badge) a 10% DISCOUNT ON MEALS. The Henry VIII Restaurant and Lounge serves breakfast from 6:30 AM to 11:00 AM and lunch from 11:00 AM until 5:00 PM. The Hotel may also offer buffet breakfasts every morning in order to expedite serving the large number that could be leaving early for tours. Duffy’s Restaurant and Pub opens from 4:30 PM to midnight Room service is available from 6:30 AM to 11:00 PM.

There are many other restaurants in the local vicinity and throughout the greater Saint Louis area. A listing of local restaurants will be posted near the AWA Reunion Information Desk.

THE REUNION PROGRAM:

GENERAL

The AWA Reunion Information Desk will be located in the Grand Ballroom of the HENRY VIII Hotel and Conference Center. All attendees should check in at the Information Desk as soon as possible after arrival at the hotel to receive updated schedules, tickets and name badges. Local area members not staying at the Hotel should also check in as early as possible during the reunion period. The Information Desk will open at 4:00 PM on Tuesday, 23 June 1998 to check in early arrivals. The Information Desk will then be open daily during the entire reunion period and close Sunday after Brunch.

The Grand Ballroom will also serve as the AWA hospitality room. Tables in the hospitality room will be set aside for specific units as appropriate.

Hosted hospitality bars will be available in the Grand Ballroom daily from 4:00 PM to 10:00 PM (11:30 PM on Sat.), as part of the basic reunion package. However, in order to permit the hotel to setup for our Friday and Saturday dinner functions, the Grand Ballroom will be closed from 3:30 PM to 6:00 PM. The hospitality bars will then be open in adjacent areas at 4:00 PM.

Wednesday, 24 June 1998

8:30 AM Hospitality room and AWA Reunion Information Desk open (Grand Ballroom).

11:00 AM GOLF TOURNAMENT AT THE FOREST PARK GOLF COURSE, tee times will be scheduled from 11 AM through 1 PM depending on number of golfers. Captains choice. The cost is $40 per person which includes: green fees, cart, priceless prizes and dinner at 5:30 PM at the Golf Course Club House (Bourbon Chicken or 11 oz BBQ Pork Steak). Rental clubs are limited; suggest you bring your own.

1:00 PM A TENNIS TOURNAMENT can be arranged at the HENRY VIII hotel courts if any reunion attendees are interested.

4:00 PM Hospitality bars open in the AWA hospitality room (Grand Ballroom).

5:30 PM Dinner at Forest Park Golf Course Club House for golfers and one (1) non-golfing spouse or guest. Cost is already included in the golf package and $13 for the non-golfing spouse or guest. (BBQ pork steak or chicken)

10:00 PM Hospitality room closes.

Thursday, 25 June 1998

7:30 AM Hospitality room and AWA Reunion Information Desk open (Grand Ballroom).

8:30 AM – 3:30 PM TOUR MISSOURI WINE COUNTRY & DANIEL BOONE HOME. A scenic guided Bus ride through Missouri countryside to Daniel Boone's home in Defiance, Missouri. Here, in surprising comfort for frontier days, Boone spent his last years in this four-story Georgian-style stone structure. When you tour the interior of the home, you'll be viewing a panorama of early Americana. Also on the grounds is Boonesfield Village, replicating a pioneer village.

Next, a visit in nearby Augusta, Missouri to the state's finest wine country, an area recognized by the federal government as being America's first official wine district. Before prohibition, when Missouri ranked as the second largest wine producing state in the nation, there were no fewer than thirteen wineries located in this small narrow valley. You'll tour one of the wineries, taste a few of the award-winning products, visit the craft and gift shops in the town, and maybe taste the fresh-baked bread. You can have lunch ON YOUR OWN at one of the Augusta restaurants.

Maximum: 180 people. COST: $27.00 per person. Tour includes: (minimum of 30 people per bus), motorcoach transportation, guide, winery tour, admission to Daniel Boone's home, and all arrangements.

9:30 AM – 3:30 PM SAINT LOUIS - CITY HIGHLIGHTS TOUR. (This tour will be available on Thursday, Friday and Saturday) The tour begins with a stop at the Cathedral of Saint Louis. The interior contains one of the largest and most beautiful displays of mosaic art in the Western Hemisphere — covering domed ceilings, numerous arches and wall panels.

A narrated riding tour to acquaint you with the city's downtown/civic area. You'll learn both past and present history of Laclede's Landing (where it all began), the Old Cathedral (oldest west of the Mississippi), the Old Courthouse (site of the Dred Scott case that played a part in the abolishment of slavery) and the historic riverfront along the Mississippi.

A stop at the magnificent Gateway Arch to see the museum of Westward Expansion and to take a tram ride to the top of this 630-foot high monument (our nation's tallest) for a fantastic 30-mile view. For those not wishing to take the tram ride, there is a thrilling film to view on the building of the Arch.

A stop at the Saint Louis Union Station. The station, with the largest train shed ever built, is an architectural treasure and a historic landmark. It has been transformed into a festive marketplace with specialty shops, entertainment, restaurants and exhibits that depict the history of the days of train travel. Lunch ON YOUR OWN is available here at a large variety of restaurants and fast-food shops.

Maximum: 320 people. COST: $23.00 per person. Tour includes, (minimum of 30 people per bus), motorcoach transportation, guide, Arch admission and tram or movie.

4:00 PM Hospitality bars open in the AWA hospitality room (Grand Ballroom).

5:30 PM - 10:00 PM RIVERBOAT GAMBLING at STATION CASINO ST. CHARLES. "The most visited Riverboat Casino in the United States." Buses will pick up AWA reunion attendees at the HENRY VIII Hotel and transport them Dockside where Fun Books will be received as you board. Enjoy Dinner ON YOUR OWN at the many eating areas on board.

COST: FREE transportation and admission provided by the Casino (minimum of 30 people per bus). Buses will return to the Hotel at 9:00 and 10:00 PM.

SEPARATE SQUADRON DINNERS are being arranged for THURSDAY EVENING at the HENRY VIII Hotel and local restaurants — see Unit/Squadron Reunion information later in this newsletter and CONTACT YOUR UNIT CHAIRPERSON for further details.

10:00 PM Hospitality room closes.

Friday, 26 June 1998

Reunion attendees have many choices on this and every day. They can meet old and new friends in the hospitality room, go to local shopping malls, ride the MetroLink to the many attractions in downtown Saint Louis and Forest Park, enjoy the pool and other amenities at the hotel, visit Scott AFB or (the better choice) reminisce with friends while taking great "Discover St. Louis Tours" on chartered buses.

7:30 AM Hospitality room and AWA Reunion Information Desk open (Grand Ballroom).

8:30 AM – 12:30 PM GRANT’S FARM (2 tours available on Friday and again on Saturday) A visit at Grant's Farm, the showplace estate of the Busch family, located on the land once farmed by General Ulysses S. Grant. You'll enter the estate riding on the trackless tram through the deer park where bison, elk, antelope and zebra roam around Grant's original log cabin and the rifle barrel fence (a memorial to the Civil War). The tram will stop at the Bauerhof area (a European-style stable surrounding a brick courtyard) where you can see a collection of antique carriages, thoroughbred horses, a small unusual zoo and a amazing bird show. Sandwiches and refreshments may be purchased in this area, along with a complimentary taste of the famous Anheuser-Busch brew.

At the end of your visit, you'll ride back to the entrance where you can browse the gift shop and visit the Clydesdales in the nearby pasture.

Maximum: 200 people. COST: $15.00 per person. Tour includes: (minimum 30 people per bus), motorcoach transportation, guide and all arrangements.

9:00 AM – 12:30 PM HISTORIC SOUTHSIDE AND BOTANICAL GARDENS (2 tours available on Friday and again on Saturday) A narrated riding tour of the historic south side of the city, reflecting the influence of the ethnic cultures in its architecture, churches and way of living. You'll pass the early French/German Soulard neighborhood with its outdoor produce market...the renovated Victorian townhouses, sometimes called the "painted ladies" because of their vivid exterior colors, surrounding St. Louis’ first public area, Lafayette Park...large mansions built by wealthy German businessmen around 1890’s in Compton Heights...and Tower Grove Park, one of the last Victorian "walking" parks in the nation.

The last stop will be the Missouri Botanical Garden, the oldest in the nation, dating back to 1859. It is internationally known for its horticultural displays, education and research. Highlights include the tropical Climatron, the exquisite Japanese and Chinese Gardens, the rose, scented and woodland gardens, the new Home Gardening demonstration areas, and the plant and gift shops. You will have time for lunch on your own on the morning tour in the Gardenview Restaurant (cafeteria-type) and a narrated tram ride around the grounds if you wish ($2.00 per person).

Maximum: 160 people. COST: $17.00 per person. Tour includes: (minimum of 30 people per bus), motorcoach transportation, guide, Botanical Garden admission and all arrangements.

9:30 AM – 3:30 PM SAINT LOUIS - CITY HIGHLIGHTS TOUR. (Explained in Thursday’s program on page 6.)

1:00 PM – 4:30 PM HISTORIC SOUTHSIDE AND BOTANICAL GARDENS (Same as Friday morning 9 AM tour.)

1:00 PM – 5:00 PM GRANT’S FARM (Same as Friday morning 8:30 AM tour.)

Anheuser-Busch Brewery Tours will be available all day Friday and Saturday via chartered shuttle buses. Reunion attendees should choose the 3 1/2 hour tour time that best fits their full schedule of activities. Times may have to be rearranged by the reunion committee since each tour time is restricted to 47 people. Attendees will be notified as appropriate. Tour times available: 9 AM - 12:30 PM; 9:30 AM - 1 PM; 10 AM - 1:30 PM; 10:30 AM - 2 PM; 11 AM - 2:30 PM; 11:30 - 3 PM; 12 N - 3:30 PM; and 12:30 PM - 4 PM. COST: $6.00 per person. The Anheuser-Busch Brewery is the world's largest brewer. You'll see the century-old home of the famous Budweiser Clydesdales and visit the historic Brew House, where a multimedia presentation tells the story of the all natural Budweiser brewing process. The Brew House's copper kettles, wall murals, ornate wrought-iron railings and hop vine chandeliers remember turn-of-the-century elegance. In the Bevo Packing Plant you will see the amazing high-speed bottling and canning lines. At tour's end, you're invited to relax over complimentary samples of their fine beers. Soft drinks are also available. Browse in Bud World, which offers an exciting selection of distinctive logo merchandise.

4:00 PM Hospitality bars open in the AWA alternate hospitality room (the Grand Ballroom will be closed to prepare for the evening buffet dinner).

7:00 PM BUFFET DINNER for all Reunion attendees (Grand Ballroom). Name cards can be placed on the table of your choice just prior to dinner. The Grand Ballroom will open by 6:30 PM.

Friday Evening BUFFET DINNER MENU: Tossed Garden Salad with choice of three dressings; Sliced Roast Baron of Beef with Mushroom Cabernet Sauce; Boneless Sautéed Breast of Chicken with White Wine Sauce; Baked Virginia Ham with a Pineapple Glaze; Oven Roasted Potatoes; Rice Pilaf; Sugar Snap Peas with Carrots Julienne, Fresh Broccoli in Lemon Butter; Warm Rolls with Sweet Butter; Coffee (reg. and decaf.); Tea and an Array of Desserts.

10:30 PM Hospitality room closes.

Saturday, 27 June 1998

7:30 AM Hospitality room and AWA Reunion Information Desk opens (Grand Ballroom).

8:30 AM – 12:30 PM GRANT’S FARM (see Friday’s Program on page 7 for explanation.)

9:00 AM – 12:30 PM HISTORIC SOUTHSIDE AND BOTANICAL GARDENS (see Friday’s Program on page 7 for explanation.)

9:30 AM – 3:30 PM SAINT LOUIS - CITY HIGHLIGHTS TOUR. (Explained in Thursday’s program on page 6.)

1:00 PM – 4:30 PM HISTORIC SOUTHSIDE AND BOTANICAL GARDENS (Same as Friday morning 9 AM tour.)

1:00 PM – 5:00 PM GRANT’S FARM (Same as Friday morning 8:30 AM tour.)

Anheuser-Busch Brewery Tours will be available all day Saturday via chartered shuttle buses. See Friday’s program on page 7 for explanation and schedule.

4:00 PM Hospitality bars open in the AWA alternate hospitality room (the Grand Ballroom will be closed to prepare for the evening buffet dinner).

7:00 PM AWA REUNION BANQUET for all reunion attendees (Grand Ballroom). Doors will open by 6:30 PM to place your name cards at your choice seat. Also, display your entree choice ticket at your place setting. A band will provide dinner music and music for dancing after dinner until 11:00 PM

BANQUET MENU: Caesar Salad, ENTREES: Petite Filet Mignon with Perigourdine Sauce, Breast of Chicken with White Wine Sauce, Broiled Salmon, or Vegetarian. Twice Baked Potatoes, Fresh Seasonal Vegetable Medley; Rolls & Butter; Coffee (reg. & decaf.) and Tea; and American Chocolate Fudge Cake.

11:30 PM Grand Ballroom closes.

Sunday, 28 June 1998

7:30 AM Hospitality room and AWA Reunion Information Desk opens (Grand Ballroom).

8:00 AM REUNION BUFFET BREAKFAST will be available until 10:30 AM in the Grand Ballroom to accommodate most of the Reunion attendees leaving that day. This is always a good time for last farewells and for discussing plans for future reunions. MENU: Fresh Fruit Salad; Array of Chilled Fruit & Vegetable Juices; Assorted Breakfast Pastries, Scrambled Eggs; Hash Brown Potatoes; Bacon & Link Sausage; Biscuits & Gravy; Hot & Cold Cereals; Coffee (reg. & decaf.) and Tea. COST: $12 per person must be paid when sending in your Registration Form, and you will surrender a meal ticket at the Breakfast.

If any reunion attendees have very early airline departure times on Sunday morning, they should use the HENRY VIII Hotel Restaurant and not select this optional breakfast buffet on their Registration form.

10:30 AM AWA scheduled Reunion activities end. Next AWA Reunion in the year 2000.

11:00 AM BRANSON TOUR Buses will depart from the HENRY VIII Hotel (more Branson info follows later in newsletter).

12:00 AWA Hospitality room and AWA Reunion Information Desk closes.

COMMEMORATIVE ITEMS FOR SALE

On the back of the Reunion Registration Form you will find information about ordering commemorative caps and shirts. The screen print commemorating the AWA ‘98 Saint Louis Reunion will appear on the White 65/35 Poly/Cotton mesh-back cap (one size fits all) and on the upper left front of the White 50/50 cotton/polyester Polo/Golf Shirt. The shirt has a 3-button placket, full collar, with knitted/banded sleeves, it is NOT a T-shirt. With a large enough order, the price should be no more than: Cap - $7; Shirt - $12. If you would like to have your name embroidered on the shirt for an additional $1.50, choose EITHER your first name or nickname (ten letters maximum). Your choice will be embroidered on the shirt in black letters. These items are suitable for both men and women. You must order them when sending in the Reunion Registration Form and pick them up at the reunion (no mail orders). If ordered, they may not be returned for reimbursement. To trade a shirt for a different size — place a note on the Reunion Bulletin Board.

REMINDER TO ALL MEMBERS planning to attend the Reunion:

You must select the minimum reunion package which includes the hospitality rooms, hosted bars, two dinner functions, Saturday evening dance band, programs, taxes & gratuities and more. No credit will be given for omission of any of these scheduled activities. Come on, where else can you get all of that for $70? Saint Louis + Scott AFB area members: give yourself and your spouse a break from the routine; have 2 meals out that reunion week and enjoy mixing with a great crowd. In order to offer the tours at rock-bottom prices (our negotiated low military reunion group cost), buses are full charters planned at 47 passengers per bus. We will keep a standby list until more tour reservation requests permit chartering additional buses. The tour and bus reservation order is based upon receipt of your form. BEST BET - SEND YOUR REUNION REGISTRATION FORM IN EARLY! Send it in by 15 May and you will be eligible for the drawing of a FREE room at the HENRY VIII Hotel or Holiday Inn.

HOW SHOULD YOU DRESS?

Except for the Saturday evening banquet where coat and tie would be suggested for men (but if you don’t have them, come anyway), casual wear is appropriate at all times. Saint Louis climatology below is from AWA Board member, Wayne McCollom (previously of USAFETAC fame).

Average Temperatures (ºF):

Jun 24  Jun 25   Jun 26   Jun 27  Jun 28

HI 87     87           88          88         88

ME 78   78         78           78         78

LO 68    68        68            69         69

Record high 105; Record low 43
Sunrise 5:38 AM; Sunset 8:30 PM
Month of June: avg. # days with thunderstorms = 7.2
Normal no. of days greater than .01 inch precip = 9.5
Normal no. of days greater than 1.0 inch precip = 1.1

REUNION NAME BADGES:

PLEASE - YOU MUST WEAR OR DISPLAY YOUR NAME BADGE AT ALL TIMES WHEN: (1) IN THE AWA HOSPITALITY ROOMS, (2) BOARDING THE BUSES, (3) AT THE MEAL FUNCTIONS and (4) if you want 10% off the meal prices in the HENRY VIII Restaurants. Your name badges will also be your admission and tour bus ticket for most events. This precaution is necessary to limit the use of AWA Reunion facilities, meals, and tour functions to those who have paid for the reunion and its optional events, AND to be readily identifiable to your compatriots who haven't seen you in years.

PLEASE DO NOT INVITE LOCAL FRIENDS TO PARTICIPATE IN REUNION ACTIVITIES UNLESS YOU HAVE PAID AND REGISTERED THEM BEFOREHAND AS YOUR GUESTS. No one will be registered at the reunion nor tours sold or exchanged by the reunion committee at the hotel. If you wish to buy, sell or exchange tour tickets at the reunion, you can place a notice on the Reunion Bulletin Board. Please see the other conditions concerning cancellations and liability as printed on the Reunion Registration Form.

WHY THE 1 JUNE CUTOFF? WHY CAN'T WE REGISTER AT THE REUNION?

The short answer is — your AWA Board of Directors are under contract for tours, buses, meals and printing for our reunion program. We must give vendors both money and numbers of participants as much as two weeks prior to a scheduled activity. All the bookkeeping is being done by the Reunion Organizer in Georgia. Add in mail time to the vendors in Saint Louis and 1 June is the latest date to meet the contract terms.

AWA Board members could pad the price of meals and tours by additional dollars and have extra money to allow later cancellations and registrations. However, this association charges you just the cost of an activity. By having full-charters, not accepting walk-in registrations, and having free labor by Board members and local member volunteers who also pay to attend, we have been able to make these reunions affordable for the greatest percentage of AWA members.

YOUR AWA BOARD OF DIRECTORS ARE CHARGED WITH ORGANIZING REUNIONS EVERY TWO YEARS FOR THE BENEFIT & ENJOYMENT OF ALL AWA MEMBERS. PLEASE DON’T LET THE RULES ON REUNION ATTENDANCE OR SCHEDULE OF EVENTS DETAILED IN THIS NEWSLETTER DETER YOU FROM ASKING QUESTIONS or FOR SPECIAL NEEDS. For questions and more information, please contact Don Farrington, our reunion organizer, at: 4149 Silver Hill Court, Lithonia, Georgia 30058-6978; Tel: (770) 985-2240 (between 6 PM and 10 PM Eastern Time please); e-mail: Cdfcsf@aol.com OR contact Kevin Lavin at (334) 213-0388 or AirWeaAssn@aol.com.

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MAKE RESERVATIONS NOW FOR A FUN TOUR OF BRANSON MISSOURI

— after the AWA 1998 REUNION

Thanks to John Collens, a tour to Branson, Missouri after the AWA reunion has been arranged. This is a "you cannot beat this offer" 4-day, 3-night tour to see the best shows and excursions that Branson offers. If you are already planning a trip to Branson — HOLD OFF!! The AWA Branson tour from Sunday, 28 June to Wednesday, 1 July 1998 will save you the extra expense of a separate trip to Missouri and provides a better group rate. First-class hotel, meals, entertainment, transportation — the AWA package has it all. This tour was initially restricted to 144 and it is now open to 240. As of 28 February 1998, over 150 reservations have been made.

The Costs. The price per person (pp) double occupancy for lodging, taxes, luggage handling, a travel guide, three breakfasts, three dinners, six shows and two tours, local Branson transportation to all events, welcome reception, and gratuities (lunches are on your own) depends on transportation chosen:

- round-trip motorcoach from Saint Louis - $440 pp (single $530; triple $410 pp; quad $395 pp)

- drive your car to Branson - $400 pp

(single $490; triple $370 pp; quad $355 pp).

MAKE YOUR RESERVATION NOW. Call 1-800-221-5692 (Branson Vacation Reservations) and identify yourself with "Air Weather Association". A $50 per person deposit will be charged to your credit card (or you can send a check) to guarantee your reservation. The balance by check or credit card is due by 14 June 1998. Cancel by 14 June and your money will be returned.

The Branson Tour Schedule. Deluxe, air-conditioned, rest room equipped motorcoaches will depart the AWA reunion Henry VIII Hotel on Sunday, 28 June 1998 at 11:00 AM — right after the reunion brunch. You will arrive at the Branson Park Inn at 4:00 PM where your escort joins the group and a welcome reception follows. [Members driving their own cars are expected to arrive at the Branson Park Inn by 4:00 PM to join the tour activities.] After the welcoming reception and hotel room check-in, this program follows:

- 5:30 PM dinner at Mesquite Charlies Restaurant

- 8:00 PM Jim Stafford Show

Monday, 29 June:

- 8:00 AM breakfast buffet at Peppercorn Restaurant

- 9:30 AM scenic Ride the Ducks Tour of Branson and Table Rock reservoir in amphibious Ducks

- 11:00 AM shopping time at Engler Block & Mountain Man shops.

- 2:00 PM Osmonds Family Show

- 4:30 PM Dinner at Brass Apple Restaurant

- 7:00 PM Andy Williams Show

Tuesday, 30 June:

- 8:30 AM buffet breakfast at Roy's Loft in Roy Clark Theatre

- 9:30 AM Doug Gabriel show at Roy Clark Theatre

- 3:00 PM big band Glenn Miller Orchestra and Bobby Vinton show

- 5:15 PM Dinner at the Cowboy Cafe

- 8:00 PM Mel Tillis and Brenda Lee Show

Wednesday, 1 July:

- 8:00 AM check out of hotel

- 8:30 AM Breakfast buffet at the Golden Corral Restaurant

- 9:30 AM depart for Saint Louis (or elsewhere if driving on own)

- 2:00 PM arrive airport (Saint Louis) drop-off if  flying out that day or back to the Henry VIII

Hotel (hotel offers AWA members the reunion room rate if Wednesday night stay is planned)

[Itinerary is subject to change, pending show schedule changes and seating availability. Branson Vacation Reservations reserves the right to make suitable itinerary changes as necessary, based on show schedules and availability.]

For more information on Branson see the Internet Home Page: http://www.bransonvacation.com or request information from Branson Vacation Reservations at 1-800-221-5692.

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OTHER ATTRACTIONS IN ST. LOUIS

In addition to the scheduled AWA reunion activities and tours, Saint Louis offers many other attractions for reunion attendees, families and guests to see on their own. More details will be at the AWA Reunion Desk at HENRY VIII.

ST. LOUIS CARDINALS are in town 19–21 June with the Diamondbacks and 22–23 June with Detroit, but out of town during the AWA Reunion dates. Tours of Busch Stadium can be arranged; call 314-421-3060. Busch Stadium is a stop on the MetroLink.

INTERNATIONAL BOWLING MUSEUM AND St. Louis Cardinals HALL OF FAME located at 111 Stadium Plaza, next to Busch Stadium. Ancient Egyptians and Fierce Vikings — What do they have in common? Bowling! Discover these and many more unusual facts as you explore bowling's 5,000 year-old history in a 50,000 square foot, state-of-the-art sports museum. Bowling is included in admission. After you tour the Bowling Museum, visit the St. Louis Cardinals Hall of Fame. Open seven days a week. Call them at 314-231-6340.

PROLOGUE ROOM AT MCDONNELL DOUGLAS CORPORATION A look into the exciting history of flight. The aerospace exhibit is available from 9:00AM to 4:00PM. The exhibit tells a panoramic story of more than 75 years of aviation progress from the company's earliest biplanes to its latest jets. Scale models, dioramas, paintings and photographs depict such important events in aviation history as the first flight around the world in 1924, the first takeoff of a jet fighter from a U.S. Navy carrier in 1946, and the first aircraft to land at the South Pole in 1956. Separate displays tell the story of the company's part in the development of commercial and military aviation. They feature large-scale models of the F-15 Eagle, F/A-18 Hornet, and AH-64 Apache combat aircraft, MD-80 and MD-11 jetliners, and military and commercial helicopters. The centerpiece of the exhibit contains full-size engineering mock-ups of the Mercury and Gemini spacecraft. The Prologue Room features a collection of original aviation art by company artists, including oil paintings by Chuck Wood and R. G. Smith, whose work is also displayed in the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC.

This tour WILL NOT include a tour of the factory where the F/A-18 is currently being produced. Maximum: 15 per van. COST: Free. Tour Includes: Transportation to and from Prologue Room. The tour is self guided and the facility is equipped with a wheelchair ramp and wheelchair accessible rest rooms.

CASINOS

There are a least 7 different riverboat casinos in and around the St. Louis, St. Charles and Alton, IL area.

FOREST PARK TOURS Daylight Hours; Reachable by Car, or MetroLink. Bounded by I-64, Kingshighway Blvd, Lindell Blvd and Skinker Street is the site of the 1904 World's Fair, which contains the Art Museum (Free Admission), Science Center (Free Admission), Zoo (Free Admission), Jewel Box, History Museum (Free Admission), 2 Golf Courses and The Muny, all connected by the free Shuttle Bug which connects to the MetroLink.

* St. Louis Art Museum is one of the leading art museums in the nation today. The Museum dates back to the early years of the century, when famed architect Cass Gilbert designed the building as the only permanent structure of the 1904 World's Fair. The first municipally-supported art museum in the nation and is proud to be dedicated to art and free to all.

* St. Louis Science Center is a playground for your head. Explore more than 600 free exhibits, purchase a ticket and see the OMNIMAX Theater presentation with its four-story domed screen and 15,000-watt sound system, Purchase another ticket and visit the Planetarium and travel through space without leaving your chair — with star show and other family programs, and see the full-size animated dinosaurs and much more.

* St. Louis Zoo is world-class with over 6,000 animals from 662 animal species and its all free. The park is on 90 beautifully landscaped acres and has the Zooline Railroad for the kids. Natural habitat areas include Big Cat Country, Jungle of the Apes and the new Bird Garden. See the Living World with its interactive video learning experiences, the Cheetah Survival Center, the Sea Lion Show and the Zootique.

* The Missouri History Museum features four levels, 15 galleries and a free audio-visual show. Highlights of St. Louis history include St. Louis in the Gilded Age and the 1904 World's Fair exhibit — and its free.

* The Muny is the country's oldest and largest outdoor musical theater presenting new Broadway show tours and classic revivals with top stars each summer. For 80 seasons, the Muny has produced the best of Broadway at the beautiful facility. Check with the Muny for shows available and tickets at 314-361-1900.

SIX FLAGS ST. LOUIS
Located on I-44 and Six Flags-Allenton Road in Eureka, Missouri. See the new Mr. Freeze Rollercoaster; Batman the Ride; Looney Tunes Town; Miss Kitty's Mystery Theater and Warner Brothers Backlot. Open daily. Call 261-938-4800 for ticket prices and more information.

SCOTT AIR FORCE BASE, ILLINOIS
Located off I-64 about 40 miles east of the HENRY VIII Hotel. Facilities could not handle large tour groups. Small group tours may be available (see the AWA Information Desk). Members are welcome to visit Scott on their own.

AFWA Historian, Lillian Nolan, still resides at Scott AFB, IL and expects to attend the AWA reunion in Saint Louis to discuss history and to accept historical articles that attendees may want to donate. She also invites members to visit her office at Scott in the AFWA (formerly HQ Air Weather Service) building.
More information on Saint Louis area attractions can be found at: http://www.st-louis-cvc.com  In addition to the scheduled AWA reunion activities and tours, Saint Louis offers many other attractions for reunion attendees, families and guests to see on their own. More details will be at the AWA Reunion Desk at HENRY VIII.

ST. LOUIS CARDINALS are in town 19–21 June with the Diamondbacks and 22–23 June with Detroit, but out of town during the AWA Reunion dates. Tours of Busch Stadium can be arranged; call 314-421-3060. Busch Stadium is a stop on the MetroLink.

INTERNATIONAL BOWLING MUSEUM AND St. Louis Cardinals HALL OF FAME located at 111 Stadium Plaza, next to Busch Stadium. Ancient Egyptians and Fierce Vikings — What do they have in common? Bowling! Discover these and many more unusual facts as you explore bowling's 5,000 year-old history in a 50,000 square foot, state-of-the-art sports museum. Bowling is included in admission. After you tour the Bowling Museum, visit the St. Louis Cardinals Hall of Fame. Open seven days a week. Call them at 314-231-6340.

PROLOGUE ROOM AT MCDONNELL DOUGLAS CORPORATION A look into the exciting history of flight. The aerospace exhibit is available from 9:00AM to 4:00PM. The exhibit tells a panoramic story of more than 75 years of aviation progress from the company's earliest biplanes to its latest jets. Scale models, dioramas, paintings and photographs depict such important events in aviation history as the first flight around the world in 1924, the first takeoff of a jet fighter from a U.S. Navy carrier in 1946, and the first aircraft to land at the South Pole in 1956. Separate displays tell the story of the company's part in the development of commercial and military aviation. They feature large-scale models of the F-15 Eagle, F/A-18 Hornet, and AH-64 Apache combat aircraft, MD-80 and MD-11 jetliners, and military and commercial helicopters. The centerpiece of the exhibit contains full-size engineering mock-ups of the Mercury and Gemini spacecraft. The Prologue Room features a collection of original aviation art by company artists, including oil paintings by Chuck Wood and R. G. Smith, whose work is also displayed in the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC.

This tour WILL NOT include a tour of the factory where the F/A-18 is currently being produced. Maximum: 15 per van. COST: Free. Tour Includes: Transportation to and from Prologue Room. The tour is self guided and the facility is equipped with a wheelchair ramp and wheelchair accessible rest rooms.

CASINOS

There are a least 7 different riverboat casinos in and around the St. Louis, St. Charles and Alton, IL area.

FOREST PARK TOURS Daylight Hours; Reachable by Car, or MetroLink. Bounded by I-64, Kingshighway Blvd, Lindell Blvd and Skinker Street is the site of the 1904 World's Fair, which contains the Art Museum (Free Admission), Science Center (Free Admission), Zoo (Free Admission), Jewel Box, History Museum (Free Admission), 2 Golf Courses and The Muny, all connected by the free Shuttle Bug which connects to the MetroLink.

* St. Louis Art Museum is one of the leading art museums in the nation today. The Museum dates back to the early years of the century, when famed architect Cass Gilbert designed the building as the only permanent structure of the 1904 World's Fair. The first municipally-supported art museum in the nation and is proud to be dedicated to art and free to all.

* St. Louis Science Center is a playground for your head. Explore more than 600 free exhibits, purchase a ticket and see the OMNIMAX Theater presentation with its four-story domed screen and 15,000-watt sound system, Purchase another ticket and visit the Planetarium and travel through space without leaving your chair — with star show and other family programs, and see the full-size animated dinosaurs and much more.

* St. Louis Zoo is world-class with over 6,000 animals from 662 animal species and its all free. The park is on 90 beautifully landscaped acres and has the Zooline Railroad for the kids. Natural habitat areas include Big Cat Country, Jungle of the Apes and the new Bird Garden. See the Living World with its interactive video learning experiences, the Cheetah Survival Center, the Sea Lion Show and the Zootique.

* The Missouri History Museum features four levels, 15 galleries and a free audio-visual show. Highlights of St. Louis history include St. Louis in the Gilded Age and the 1904 World's Fair exhibit — and its free.

* The Muny is the country's oldest and largest outdoor musical theater presenting new Broadway show tours and classic revivals with top stars each summer. For 80 seasons, the Muny has produced the best of Broadway at the beautiful facility. Check with the Muny for shows available and tickets at 314-361-1900.

SIX FLAGS ST. LOUIS
Located on I-44 and Six Flags-Allenton Road in Eureka, Missouri. See the new Mr. Freeze Rollercoaster; Batman the Ride; Looney Tunes Town; Miss Kitty's Mystery Theater and Warner Brothers Backlot. Open daily. Call 261-938-4800 for ticket prices and more information.

SCOTT AIR FORCE BASE, ILLINOIS
Located off I-64 about 40 miles east of the HENRY VIII Hotel. Facilities could not handle large tour groups. Small group tours may be available (see the AWA Information Desk). Members are welcome to visit Scott on their own.

AFWA Historian, Lillian Nolan, still resides at Scott AFB, IL and expects to attend the AWA reunion in Saint Louis to discuss history and to accept historical articles that attendees may want to donate. She also invites members to visit her office at Scott in the AFWA (formerly HQ Air Weather Service) building.
More information on Saint Louis area attractions can be found at: http://www.st-louis-cvc.com 

IF YOU HAVEN’T ALREADY, PLEASE TAKE THE TIME NOW TO UPDATE YOUR PERSONAL DATA IN THE JANUARY 1998 ROSTER. If any changes are required, even if it is just an area code or ZIP code change, please send them as soon as possible to Freeman Smith, the AWA locator. His snail mail and e-mail addresses are on the Roster’s front cover. In addition, if you plan on moving before February 1999, make a note to notify Freeman or you may miss the next issue of the annual AWA Roster and Newsletter. Thanks in advance for your help in keeping our locator file current.

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HELP YOUR AWA GROW

When you check the new AWA Roster and note someone is not listed, you can help your Association grow by sending the enclosed membership application to that person. Many individuals do not yet know the AWA exists. With your urging they may join and attend the June 1998 reunion.

Copy the application if you can and provide it to others. Keep copies on file for the right occasions.

Have you considered giving a gift membership in the Association? It makes a great "I’m thinking of you" present. It also makes an inexpensive award that lasts a lifetime.

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ADVERTISEMENTS ARE NEEDED

ADVERTISEMENTS ARE NEEDED

ADVERTISEMENTS ARE NEEDED

Advertisements help defray the costs of AWA activities, awards, publishing, and mailing newsletters, rosters and correspondence. Ads help keep our lifetime membership costs low. We also accept Ads as barter for placement of AWA information in other publications. All members are requested to help find Ad sources. Please pass them to the Newsletter Editor. Thanks to John Lasley, Jimmie Smith and Bob Palmer for advertisements in 1998.

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— Video for sale —

FORECAST FOR VICTORY

FORECAST FOR VICTORY

FORECAST FOR VICTORY

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***

AIR WEATHER SERVICE redesignated as AIR FORCE WEATHER AGENCY

On 15 October 1997, Brigadier General Fred P. Lewis, Air Force Director of Weather, presided over a ceremony at Offutt AFB, Nebraska redesignating Air Weather Service (AWS) as the Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA). It will carry all of the 60 years of heritage from 1 July 1937 — when the War Department transferred the responsibility for providing Army Air Corps weather services from the Signal Corps to a small group designated as the Army Air Corps Weather Service. The AFWA combines AWS and Air Force Global Weather Center (AFGWC) into a single, operations-focused, AF Field Operating Agency. The AFWA emblem will be the same as the AWS except for the title (see new emblem on right side of heading at top of this page). Over the next year, the AFWA will be consolidated at Offutt AFB, NE; what was the AWS Headquarters at Scott AFB, IL will move to Offutt.

Colonel John L. Hayes, AFGWC Commander, assumed command of the Air Weather Service on 12 September 1997 upon the retirement of Colonel Joe Dushan, and now is the First Commander of the newly designated Air Force Weather Agency.

Colonel Jack Hayes, a native of Toledo, Ohio, was commissioned through the Reserve Officer Training Corps program at Bowling Green State University. In August 1970, he entered active duty as a meteorology student at the University of Oklahoma. He then served in several key staff and command positions, including staff weather officer supporting the 363rd Tactical Reconnaissance Wing, Shaw AFB, SC; staff weather officer for the 376th Strategic and 9th Strategic Reconnaissance Wings and as the Officer in Charge of the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program site, Kadena AB, Japan; Chief of Numerical Weather Forecasting and Operations Staff Officer, Air Force Global Weather Central, Offutt AFB, NE; staff meteorologist for a classified program, Under Secretary of the Air Force, Office of Space Systems, Pentagon; Director of Aerospace Technology Development and Director of Planning, HQ AWS, Scott AFB, IL; Weather Detachment Commander and Director of Staff Meteorology for the Western Space and Missile Center, Vandenburg AFB, CA; Director of Staff Meteorology, Aeronautical Systems Division, and Chief of the Weather Division, HQ AFMC, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH; Vice Commander HQ AWS, Scott AFB, IL, and from May 1995 to October 1997 as Commander, Air Force Global Weather Center, Offutt AFB, NE. Jack Hayes earned M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in meteorology from the US Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA, in 1977 and 1985, respectively. He was a Councilor of the National Weather Association (96-97) and was recently elected to a Councilor position for the American Meteorological Society.

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AFWA UPDATE by Colonel Tom Accola

It has been an exciting and action-filled five months since we combined AWS and AFGWC to stand up Air Force Weather Agency on 15 Oct 97. Modern technology — e-mails and conference calls — plus a fair amount of travel between Scott AFB and Offutt AFB have enabled us to meet the challenge of a geographically split AFWA staff with good results. We’ve focused hard on meeting the requirements of AF-wide weather reengineering: standing up the first three regional hubs [Air Force Weather continues on its strategic plan to reengineer field units into regional hubs (operational weather squadrons) and Combat/Unit Weather Teams focusing their reduced number of personnel on operational weather support and training.] designing an architecture to meet their data/product needs; building programs to acquire the equipment they’ll need to do the job. We’re approaching reengineering with a considerable sense of urgency — we have the support of USAF senior leadership in Washington and at the major commands to do this, and we want to take advantage of this support and momentum at its peak. Simultaneously, we’re working hard at moving functions and people from Scott to Offutt. It’s requiring extra effort from people who were already surging to execute the AFWA mission — it’s gratifying to witness the enthusiasm and initiative that our young officers, enlisted men and women, and civilians exhibit as we go about these important tasks.

By the time we complete the transfer of functions and people from Scott to Offutt next year, there will be a different look and feel to AFWA offices in the Martin Bomber Building. We’ll be moving some of our personnel into the facility vacated by the 6th Space Operations Squadron — the personnel who "fly" the DMSP satellites — as their mission moves to NOAA’s Suitland, Maryland facility. These offices are located on the lower level of the western portion of the Martin Bomber Building. We’ll renovate the main entrance to AFWA, creating a lobby to accommodate the historical items that we’ll bring to Offutt from the former AWS lobby at Scott.

Replacing older, bulkier technology with newer, space saving equipment will allow us to house many of the functions we’re moving here from Scott in our current offices. And we’re restructuring forecast production — rebuilding it on concepts that take advantage of our new strategic relationship with National Weather Service production centers and meet the ever-expanding requirements of our many customers — including the new AF Weather hubs. We’re also standing up an Air Force Radio and Television Service element that will join the CINC Target Weather Cell and Special Operations Forces Weather Operations Center as AFWA’s newest operational centralized workcenters at Offutt.

We haven’t neglected the basic science of meteorology and the necessity to support on-going DOD operations as we’ve gone about these organizational changes. While we’ve made great strides in virtually every aspect of the operational science, we’ve made our most productive advances in fine-scale modeling. As each hot-spot around the world has drawn the attention of decision-makers, we’ve expanded our product line to meet their needs, delivering 3D displays in resolutions as fine as 4 km for places like Bosnia, SW Asia, and Korea. We believe that the success of the hub concept is highly dependent on our ability to provide them with fine scale model data, and have given this priority in our strategic approach.

If you have the ability to go on-line, you can keep up with these and many other AFWA activities and operations with the push of a button. Just dial up our AFWA Internet home page public site at: http://www.scott.af.mil/afwa/ or via the AWA home page at http://www.geocities.com/Pentagon/2695.

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LAST CALL TO JOIN AWA MEMBERS ON A MEDITERRANEAN CRUISE

Here is a reminder – the newest, largest cruise ship in the world, the GRAND PRINCESS, will sail with some AWA members aboard visiting various ports in the Mediterranean Ocean. The better cabins are nearly sold out. If you want to join the group at its "can't beat our price", then dial 1-800-642-2469 (THE CRUISE PEOPLE), ask for Karen and get any info or brochure you need to make a decision.

Our AWA member and group leader, John Collens and wife Barbara, are paying their own way. The free cabins earned by our group will be awarded as shipboard credit to everyone, as much as $200 per person. Our block of staterooms start at $2361 per person, double occupancy, plus round-trip air. Outside cabins with private balcony start at $2947 and very few (if any) are left.

Need a roommate? Five widows and a widower are among the 42 persons who have made the required, reimbursable $600 deposit. The group is composed entirely of retired persons with a military background and/or spouse. You'll fit in nicely.

The 13-day, 12-night cruise itinerary: board Grand Princess 30 August 1998 at Istanbul, sail next afternoon to Kusadasi (port for Ephesus, Turkey), then Athens, Venice, Naples, Livorno (port for Florence and Pisa, Italy), Monte Carlo, Barcelona, and disembark the morning of September 11. At each of these stops you are all day in port for sightseeing. A BIG PLUS: at Istanbul, Venice and Barcelona you'll have additional time there while overnight aboard in port.

NO OTHER TOUR AGENCY BEATS OUR GROUP PRICE WITH SHIPBOARD CREDIT. CHECK IT OUT. IT'S FIRST-CLASS ALL THE WAY. Contact THE CRUISE PEOPLE, 10191 W. SAMPLE RD., SUITE 215, CORAL SPRINGS FL 33065. Questions? Talk to the owner, Karen, toll-free at 1-800-642-2469. A $600 per person deposit will be due when you make your cabin selection.

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Did you know? — On 21 March 1942, a weather detachment was formed at Tuskegee Institute, AL to support 2 all-black fighter squadrons. AAF Weather Service’s only all-black weather unit was commanded by 1st Lt Wallace P. Reed, who completed the aviation meteorological cadet program at MIT.

Limited Number of Books Still Available

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Flying the WEATHER — The Story of Air Weather Reconnaissance

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Flying the WEATHER —

Flying the WEATHER —

Flying the WEATHER — by Otha C. Spencer.

After three years of research, writing and editing, Flying the WEATHER has been published. AWA member, Otha Spencer began his recon experience in 1944 as a pilot with the 2nd Weather Reconnaissance Squadron, flying B-25Ds on route reconnaissance over the North Atlantic. The book details the history of weather reconnaissance from his experiences, his passion for the mission and from the many personal stories, interviews and correspondence he received. He thanks the many members of the Air Weather Reconnaissance Association, Air Weather Association and the Pacific Air Trackers for their help. At the 1994 AWA reunion in Tucson, he received so much research material, he had to buy an extra large flight bag to carry it home. He was an Air Force Pilot from 1941-1946. He is a professor emeritus of journalism at Texas A&M University in Commerce, the author of eight books and hundreds of magazine articles, and a commercial photographer.

The soft-cover books are available directly from the author at $14.95 plus $3 for shipping/handling for a total of $17.95 (Texas residents add $1.01 for sales tax.) On request, the book will be autographed by the author. Please write clearly the person to whom the autograph should be addressed to.

To order copies send a request to: Otha C. Spencer, Route 2 Box 54, Campbell TX 75422, include a check or money order for the total payment and provide a clearly printed or typed mailing address.

References

Historical information in this newsletter such as in Necrologies, Did you know? and Years Ago sections was checked against or directly obtained from:

Air Weather Service: Our Heritage 1937-1987, A Military Airlift Command Historical Office Special Study by Rita M. Markus, Master Sergeant Nicholas F. Halbeisen and John F. Fuller, and Edited by James K. Matthews and Joylyn I. Gustin, Military Airlift Command, USAF, Scott AFB, Illinois, July 1987.

25 Years Ago — 3 March 1973, the last AWS unit in Republic of Vietnam (Det 1, 10WS at Tan Son Nhut AB) was inactivated.

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— In Memoriam —

(Please see the 1998 AWA Roster for a listing of deceased members we have been notified about since the 1997 Roster. These individuals should be remembered by all of us for their great contributions to our Association, Air Force Weather and indeed—our nation. Our deepest sympathy goes out to their remaining spouses and other family members. Time and space unfortunately limits us to printing a small number of obituaries. The following were submitted by members.)

Lt. Gen. THOMAS S. MOORMAN (1910-1997) SEVENTH COMMANDER OF AIR WEATHER SERVICE (23 April 1954 – 27 March 1958)
The son of an Army officer, Thomas Samuel Moorman, was born at the Presidio of Monterey, CA on 11 July 1910. He attended John J. Phillips High School in Birmingham, AL, and in 1933 he graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point, with a commission as a second lieutenant. He then entered the Air Corps Flying Training School at Randolph Field, TX. He earned his pilot wings in October 1934 and was assigned to the 4th Observation Squadron, 5th composite Group at Luke Field, Hawaii. In October 1936, he married Miss Atha Grace Gullion, the daughter of an Army judge advocate who was chief prosecutor in the court martial of Major General Billy Mitchell. The Moormans raised four children.

In July 1936, Second Lieutenant Moorman was promoted to first lieutenant and was assigned to the 97th Reconnaissance Squadron at Mitchel Field, NY for a 12-month tour. In 1937, he entered the field of meteorology, obtained a masters degree from the California Institute of Technology, and embarked on a sphere of activity that would dominate the next 20 years of his career. In 1938, he was assigned as assistant station weather officer at Randolph Field under Captain Don Z. Zimmerman (3rd Commander of AWS). He also served as assistant instructor for meteorology at the flight school there. In 1940, First Lieutenant Moorman teamed with Captain Zimmerman to write the first Army-published Weather Manual For Pilots. He was promoted to captain on 5 October 1940 and major on 22 July 1941. Moorman was part of a six-man team that formed a Weather Research Center at Bolling Field which became a weather central for long-range forecasting. In July 1941, Major Moorman was assigned to Air Corps Headquarters in Washington, D.C., where he served as Chief Climatologist, Assistant Director of the Air Corps Research Center, and liaison officer to the U.S. Weather Bureau. A joint Army-Navy-Weather Bureau central was formed in February 1942, based on a recommendation by Moorman, and it later became the Joint Weather Central. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel on 23 January 1942.

On 1 May 1943, the 21st Weather Squadron, the first fully-mobile squadron trained exclusively for combat, was activated at Bradley Field, Connecticut, and Lieutenant Colonel Moorman became its regional control officer. He was promoted to colonel in August 1943 and assumed command of the 21st on 1 September 1943, then located in England. On 16 October 1943, Colonel Moorman became staff weather officer to, and later director of weather to the Ninth Air Force in the European Theater of Operations. In 1944, Colonel Moorman also functioned as the liaison officer for the American First Army commanded by Lt. Gen. Omar N. Bradley.

In 1945, Colonel Moorman returned to the U.S. as Deputy Chief of Staff, Air Weather Service under Colonel Don Yates (5th Commander of AWS). A year later Colonel Moorman became the air weather officer at Headquarters Army Air Corps until he entered Air War College in 1947.

In January 1949, Colonel Moorman was sent to Tokyo as Commander of the 2143rd Air Weather Wing; he also served indirectly as staff weather officer to General of the Army Douglas MacArthur. In August 1951, he became Deputy Commander of Air Weather Service under General William O. Senter and received his first star in September 1952. On 23 April 1954, he was appointed Commander of Air Weather Service, and in October 1956 he received his second star. He left AWS in March 1958 as Colonel Norman L. Peterson assumed command. In April 1958, Major General Moorman assumed command of the Thirteenth Air Force at Clark Air Base, Philippines, and on 28 July 1961 he became Vice Commander in Chief, Headquarters, Pacific Air Forces, Hickam AFB, Hawaii. That same year he was promoted to lieutenant general. On 1 July 1965, he became Superintendent of the Air Force Academy at Colorado Springs, CO. General Moorman has been the longest serving Superintendent to date. He retired from the Air Force in 1970 with 37 years service to his country.

Significant events during General Moorman’s tenure as AWS Commander include installation on 20 June 1954 at Maxwell AFB, AL, of the first radar specifically designed for meteorological use (AN/CPS-9); activation of the Joint Numerical Weather Prediction Unit at Suitland, Maryland, in July 1954 (with AWS’ Dr. George P. Cressman as director); the First Issue of the AWS Command Newspaper, the Observer published in November 1954; WB-50Ds first delivered to AWS in 1955; first formal treatise on AWS doctrine, AF Manual 105-6, Weather Service for Military Agencies, published December 1956 and included AWS capabilities and limitations; on 7 June 1957, first AWS Commanders Awards presented; expansion of Global Weather Central, Offutt AFB, NE, following the closure of the USAF Weather Central at Suitland in 1957.

In later years, General Moorman served as President of Friends of the Air Force Academy Library, a trustee of the Falcon Foundation, and a member of the board of directors of the Air Academy National Bank, as well serving on other corporate boards. He was also very active in environmental issues, serving on the Colorado Air Resources Board and as an Advisor to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

General Moorman died in Sterling, VA on 23 December 1997 and his funeral was held at the Air Force Academy on 29 December. He was preceded in death by his wife in 1988 and is survived by his four children: Margaret Demchuk, Allyn Moorman Sullivan, General Thomas S. Moorman, Jr., and Robert W. Moorman; his sister, Betty Moorman, and eight grandchildren.

JAMES H. ‘STORMY’ LOGAN JR. (1919-1997)
Retired Lt. Col. James H. "Stormy" Logan, Jr., departed this life on July 8, 1997, in San Angelo, Texas. Stormy, as everyone called him, was born on November 11, 1919, in Dallas. Stormy was a 32nd Degree Mason for 50 years and retired form the United States Air Force in 1975. During his life in the Air Force he went to weather forecaster, modern weather techniques and radar weather training schools. Stormy also was in a prison camp in Germany for 11 months and 29 days. He worked at the Pentagon under the Kennedy administration and was a forecaster for Air Force One flights for both President Kennedy and President Johnson. He helped provide the weather support for the Air Force One flight returning to Washington with President Johnson and President Kennedy’s body after Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas.

When he retired from the Air Force, he was a professional meteorologist. He also attended the University of Houston. Stormy and Dee were married August 26, 1943, and had celebrated their 50th anniversary before the loss of their son. Stormy was preceded in death by his parents and his son he loved very much, James W. Logan.

Stormy is survived by his wife, Dee of San Angelo; a son and daughter-in-law, Robert H. and Karen Logan of Aurora, Colorado; a daughter and son-in-law, Cissy and Joe Johannessen of Woodville; one sister, Elizabeth Logan of Dallas; two grandsons, B.J. Logan and Chris Logan; and granddaughters, Lynn, Phyllis, Paula, Cindy and Christy. Stormy also is survived by a host of friends that thought the world of him. Stormy always had a joke and a smile for his friends and family. This is why it was a comfort for the family that he just fell asleep and departed this life peacefully. The family requests that anyone wanting to honor Stormy to just remember his smile and laughter or send a donation to a favorite charity.

**

Colonel WILLIAM E. CUMMINS II (1926-1997)
William Edward Cummins II, 70, retired U.S. Air Force colonel, died Sunday, August 3, 1997. Born November 20, 1926, in Tacoma, Washington, he had been a resident of Hampton, Virginia for many years and was a member of St. Joseph Catholic Church. As a member of the Knights of Columbus, a Third Degree Ceremony was conducted in his honor in June 1997. He was a graduate of Gonzaga Prep High School in Spokane, Washington, Washington State University, Saint Louis University, the Armed Forces Staff College and the Industrial College of the Armed Forces.

Col. Cummins served in the U.S. Navy during World War II and then served 30 years in the U.S. Air Force in various weather service-related assignments. Included in his postings were tours in Turkey, Germany and Vietnam. He commanded the 5th Weather Squadron at Ft. McPherson, GA, 1968-1969, and 1st Weather Wing in Hawaii, 1974-1975. From 1975 through 1978, he served as the senior staff weather officer to the Air Staff, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C.

Included among his many awards and decorations were the American Campaign medal, Vietnam Service Medal, Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm, the Bronze Star, Meritorious Service Medal and the Legion of Merit.

In January, Col. Cummins was preceded in death by his wife of 46 years, Catherine M. Cummins. He is survived by a daughter, Denise; son-in-law, Dr. Gary Shaffer; and granddaughter, Lisa, all of Chapel Hill, N.C.; brother-in-law, Dr. Louis Hall of Elliott, Iowa; and many nieces and nephews. A Mass of Christian burial was celebrated at St. Joseph Catholic Church in Hampton by the Rev. Joseph Majewski, interment with full military honors was held on Monday, August 11, in Arlington National Cemetery. Donations may be made to the Holy Family Retreat, P.O. Box 3151, Hampton, VA 23663.

Bill and Cathy gave extraordinary support to Air Force Weather, the Air Weather Association and all people they met — they would always do more than their share as evidenced by their great help at the AWA 1996 reunion in Hampton. They were grand hosts, always smiling, enticing others to enjoy life and never even mentioning their problems with cancer. When asked, they would always be positive, showing their great faith. Becky Mason wrote, There’s no doubt about it, our loss is Heaven’s gain. At Bill’s funeral, the Priest quipped that when Bill went through the Pearly Gate, it probably squeaked; prompting Bill to say — Hey Pete, if you’ve got some WD-40, I’ll fix that for you. That’s just the kind of people Bill and Cathy were — always focused on helping others.

Colonel JOHN D. SHARP (1929-1997)
John "Jack" Douglass Sharp, Colonel USAF (Ret.), born in Philadelphia on August 19, 1929, died at his residence in Holland, Pennsylvania, on May 27, 1997. He graduated from Florida State University with a B.S. in Mathematics in 1953. He immediately went on to receive a B.S. in Meteorology in 1954 from The Pennsylvania State University. In 1962, while serving as an Air Force Weather officer, he earned his M.S. degree in Meteorology from Florida State University.

His 21-year career in the Air Weather Service began in 1953. Until 1965 he served as a forecaster, aerial weather observer, climatologist, and computer systems analyst in places as diverse as Alaska and Morocco. From 1965-70 he was the principle architect and operational manager of the Automated Weather Network (AWN), a pioneering world-wide computer network that gathered weather data over the entire globe and moved it to a central point for analysis and forecasting. This system revolutionized weather data collection and distribution. The AWN immediately became a national resource, simultaneously providing the same data base to the Air Force, Navy and U.S. Weather Bureau faster than ever before.

From 1970-71 he was Assistant Director of Operations at the Air Force Global Weather Central, coordinating weather support requirements of DoD agencies plus the national intelligence community. He then became Chief of Analysis and Forecasting at Global from 1971-73 as AWS weather centers around the world were being closed and AFGWC was taking on more world-wide centralized responsibilities. From 1973 until his retirement in 1974 he was Chief of Aerospace Sciences at 3rd Weather Wing supporting, Headquarters Strategic Air Command.

After retirement, Jack joined Northern Natural Gas Company in Omaha, Nebraska as their corporate meteorologist. In 1985, he retired from Northern and Founded Vortex, Inc., Weather Consultants. He sold Vortex to the Omaha NBC affiliate in 1987 and served as their senior meteorologist until retiring to return to his roots in Pennsylvania where he and his wife of 47 years, Almira (Mortimer) Sharp, could be closer to both of their families.

Jack's list of interests and achievements is as diverse as it is long. It was at FSU in 1952 that he became National NCAA Champion on the Swinging Rings. For his gymnastics achievements Jack was inducted into Florida State's Hall of Fame in September 1997. He received an M.S. in Agency Counseling in 1977 and enjoyed counseling clients in his home in Omaha. His final period of retirement found him active as a tutor of English as a Second Language through Volunteers in Teaching Alternatives. He also served on the Military Council of the Center for Defense Information. Jack's favorite aspect of being involved with these groups was making new friends.

Jack's pride in his service to his country and his passion for meteorology culminated in an unfinished book, "Cold Fronts," that he enjoyed putting together from a historical and biographical perspective. He was able to relive his Air Weather Service Career during the Cold War. In his final years he also enjoyed analyzing the parallels between his love of the sky with the uncertainty of weather prediction and the uncertainty of living with cancer and how the human mind copes when faced with such realities. Almira, their four children, and remainder of his family and friends will always remember Jack as a man who continually sought new challenges, who succeeded at each endeavor he undertook and whose love for learning and sharing was contagious. Almira penned that, She and Jack certainly enjoyed the AWA reunion in 1996. It was a great boost for Jack to see so many good old friends.

Lieutenant Colonel DAVID M. LUDLUM (1910-1997)

David M. Ludlum died at his home in Princeton, NJ on 23 May 1997. He was born in East Orange, NJ in 1910 and although interested in weather, he obtained degrees in history: a Bachelor’s and Doctorate at Princeton and a Master’s at the University of California at Berkeley. In 1941, after teaching high school history for three years and the war in Europe escalating, he went to Washington and talked to Capt. Arthur Merewether, Chief of the Weather Section at HQs Army Air Corps. He enlisted in the Army and asked for meteorology work. He trained as an observer at Mitchel Field, NY and soon went to Chanute for forecaster training. He rose quickly to technical sergeant and was accepted for officer candidate school. As a 2nd Lt., he was assigned to the 12th Weather Squadron and led a mobile unit to North Africa in December 1942. As a battlefield forecaster, he rose in rank quickly and in February 1944, Capt. Ludlum was asked to make the forecast for the bombing of Cassino, Italy. Lt. Gen. Clark dubbed it "operation Ludlum," the only WW II operation named for its weatherman. This was picked up by Time and Newsweek and the notoriety actually helped the AAF Weather Service get more appropriations. He rose to the rank of Lt. Col. before leaving military service. When returning home, he sold weather instruments for Bendix Corporation and then in 1947, he formed Science Associates. During that year, he also worked a short time as one of the nations first television and radio weather forecasters on WCAU in Philadelphia. Always interested in weather, education and writing, he published the first issue of Weatherwise magazine in February 1948 [The 50th Anniversary issue was recently published containing a number of Dave Ludlum’s signature articles and shorter notes.] His love for history surfaced again in 1963 when he began publishing a series of 12 books on American weather history. He sold the Science Associates weather equipment business in 1978 and sold the magazine to Heldref Publications. He continued providing articles to Weatherwise and authored the "Weatherwatch" column until 1994. His final book, The Audubon Society’s Guide to North American Weather, was published in 1991. Dave easily won for himself the title of America’s premiere weather historian.

A memorial service was held for Dave at Princeton University. He is survived by his wife, Rita (Manion) Ludlum, whom he met while she was an executive assistant at AMS headquarters. He is also survived by a daughter, Carol Collier of Trappe, PA; four sons, Kenneth of Hillsborough, CA, David A. of New York City, Peter of Mission Viejo, CA and Stephen of Newton, MA; and eight grandchildren.

See more information on Lt. Col. Ludlum in Thor’s Legions: Weather Support to the U.S. Air Force and Army, 1937-1987 by John F. Fuller, 1990, published by the American Meteorological Society, Boston. Also see, America’s Weather Warriors 1814-1985 by Charles C. Bates and John F. Fuller, 1986, published by Texas A&M University Press, College Station.

Colonel WILLIAM M. MAINTZ SR. (1920-1997)

William Martin Maintz, Sr. was born in Germany on 7 July 1920 and died at the Citrus Memorial Hospital, Inverness, Florida on 9 March 1997. A graduate of Moravian College, class of ‘42 and also of New York University, Colonel Maintz enjoyed a successful 28 years in the Air Weather Service. His last duty was with the Military Airlift Command in the Inspector General’s Office at Scott Air Force Base in Belleville, Illinois. After retirement from the Air Force he served eleven years in secondary education as an Algebra, Geometry and Aviation teacher in Freeburg, Illinois. He then retired to Dunnellon, Florida. He is survived by his wife, Mina, of Dunnellon, Florida; a daughter Marlene Swain of Littleton, Colorado; a son William of Lake St. Louis, Missouri; and three grandchildren William of Houston, Texas, and Wade and Allison both of Lake St. Louis, Missouri.

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60 Years Ago — Capt Leon W. Johnson, one of the 22 Charter Officers in the Army Air Corps Weather Service was the first commander (Jul 37–Jul 40) of the Third Weather Squadron, originating at Barksdale Field, LA. In August 1943, Col. Johnson as a B-24 pilot, led one of four bomber groups over Ploesti, and was one of five to receive the Congressional Medal of Honor for that significant raid. He retired in July 1961 as Air Deputy, Supreme Allied Command Europe. General Johnson passed away at age 93 on 10 November 1997.

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America Commemorates Satellite Launch

Press Release from: Cape Canaveral Air Station, FL -

Forty years ago on 31 January 1958 at 10:48 p.m. EST, the United States celebrated its first successful satellite launch into space, forever changing America's means of communicating, navigating, and monitoring weather and exploring the universe. [TIROS I launched 1 April 1960.]

"It's amazing to think in early 1958 America had just one satellite in orbit. Today, if you include other nations, there are more than 500 satellites in orbit, which will be joined by another 1,200 to 1,500 in the next decade," said Brig. Gen. Randy Starbuck, 45th Space Wing commander.

The historic 1958 launch catapulted America into a space race led by the Russians, four months before.

The satellite launch came after two one-day delays due to winds. Crammed into its tiny payload section, Explorer I carried instruments to study the space environment and two radio transmitters to send information back to Earth.

Microphones in the forward section measured micrometeorite impacts. Temperature sensors measured payload and hull temperatures, and helped the United States evaluate the use of surface coatings for passive temperature control. The most important instrument was a Geiger Counter designed by Dr. James Van Allen of the University of Iowa to measure the intensity of cosmic ray radiation around the Earth. This region is now known as the Van Allen Radiation Belt.

The satellite made more than 58,000 orbits around the earth, traveling at speeds of more than 17,000 mph. Explorer I ceased transmission of data on 23 May 1958, when its batteries died, but remained in orbit for more than 12 years. It made a fiery re-entry over the Pacific Ocean on 31 March 1970.

"In 1958 it was Explorer I; today we have Cassini on its way to Saturn. And, as we look at the future it is important to realize that commercial and military developments of space are vital to our economy and national security," said Starbuck.

Space Launch Weather Support History

The US Air Force’s 45th Weather Squadron (Patrick AFB – Cape Canaveral – Kennedy Space Center Florida weather support) needs your help in compiling a history of weather support to the space program. If you were ever involved in Launch Weather Support, from the 1940s to the 1990s, they want your narrative history, your stories, your anecdotes, your gossip, copies of your photos, patches, or anything else you think might be useful to create a living history. The 45th Weather Squadron project officer is Captain Mike Hinson. You can reach him at 45 WS/SY, 1201 Minuteman Street, Patrick AFB, FL 32925-3238; DSN 854-7426; Commercial phone: (407) 494-7426; or e-mail: michael-hinson@pafb.af.mil.

UNIT & ASSOCIATION REUNIONS —

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6th Weather Squadron (Mobile) Alumni Association

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Air Weather Reconnaissance Association

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15th & 20th Weather Squadrons Association

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WW II 17th Weather Squadron Association —Weather Merchants will have their next reunion with the AWA reunion, 24–28 June 1998 in Saint Louis, MO.

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18th Weather Squadron will hold a reunion with the AWA at the Henry VIII Hotel in Saint Louis, MO from 24–28 June 1998.

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Space Coast – Central Florida region AWA

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21st Weather Squadron, 40th Mobile Comm Squadron, AAF, WW II are planning their next reunion for late in October 1999 in the State of Florida. For details as they unfold, contact: Irv Kirch, 34 Hoss Road, Indianapolis, IN 46217; (317) 786-6858; e-mail: IRV8@juno.com

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3349th Technical Training Squadron, Dept. of Weather Training, (Chanute Instructors) This group is made up of weather forecaster and weather observer course instructors and support personnel assigned to Chanute from the period of the mid-40s through the mid-50s. They will hold their next reunion with the AWA in Saint Louis, 24–28 June 1998. They plan to have a welcoming reception on Wednesday evening, 24 June; a special squadron banquet on Thursday evening and a squadron hospitality room. For further info and/or to be added to their mailing list, write to: Paul W. Schlotterbeck, 3349th TTS Reunion Coordinator, 1130 Ashley Way, Susanville CA 96130-6013; (530) 251-2462.

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NAVAL WEATHER SERVICE ASSOCIATION

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ROWF–Retired Old Weather Friends The Washington, D.C. area retired weather officers are still holding bi-monthly meetings at the Fort Myer Officers’ Club—a tradition that has continued for several years now. The gathering normally begins at about 5:30 PM on the second Thursday of odd numbered months. For more information contact Dave Pace (703) 490-6894, DPace@jnpcs.com; John Lasley 410-229-7524, lasley@awi-smi.com; or Larry Johnson (703) 883-8645, johnson_larry@prc.com.

WHY DO THEY MEET AT FT MYER? Maybe it’s close to work & home; maybe it’s nostalgia —

The following story is from the September 1925 issue of THE MENTOR magazine which has been out of print for many years. It was sent to the AWA newsletter from Hal Todd, newsletter editor for the 15th & 20th Weather Squadrons. John Fuller’s Thor’s Legions also has more details such as the inclusion ( ) in the next column, upper right.

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THE STORY OF UNCLE SAM'S WEATHER BUREAU AND THE PERSONALITY BEHIND IT, CALLED "OLD PROBS"

In the seventies of the last century the most famous personage in the United States was "Old Probabilities," otherwise known as "Old Probs." He enjoyed a species of celebrity for which there was no precedent. There had been men and women before his time whose names were household words, but there had never been anybody who addressed a daily message to the entire country every day in the year, and whose published remarks were eagerly awaited and earnestly scanned in practically every home. His theme was one of universal interest—the weather. His predictions were consulted by the farmer, in doubt about cutting his hay; the vessel master, anxious to dodge the storms; young America, planning a picnic or a baseball game. Not everybody put unlimited faith in Old Probs. Some made jokes about him, as people have done about Weather Forecasters ever since, but nobody ignored him. P.T. Barnum must have turned green with envy whenever he thought of the boundless publicity achieved by the man whose announcements were displayed daily on the first page of every newspaper in the land.

Old Probs real name is perpetuated in that of an important military post across from the Potomac River from Washington—Fort Myer. Even at the Zenith of his fame, General Albert J. Myer was a somewhat shadowy personality to the vast majority of his fellow countrymen. In military and scientific circles he was a more tangible figure. He was well known to soldiers, both in this country and abroad, as the inventor of an ingenious system of military signaling. This system was inspired by the signaling methods of the Indians, which he had observed while serving in the West as an army surgeon. It was taken up by the government, and Myer was appointed the first chief signal officer and the head of a new branch of the army known as the Signal Corps. In this capacity he rendered brilliant service to his country during the Civil War.

Far-seeing men had for years advocated the establishment of a system of weather forecasts and storm warning based on telegraphic reports of meteorological observations, and the idea had been proved feasible by the experience of foreign governments and by unofficial undertaking in this country, when, in 1870, Congress took the momentous step on inaugurating such a system. The work was entrusted to the Signal Corps. (General Myer convinced the Secretary of War and politicians that weather service could be performed more reliably and cheaply by the military rather than a civilian agency.) General Myer and the officers and men under him suddenly found themselves engaged in tasks having nothing to do with the art of war.

A few civilian scientific men were engaged to assist them, but on the whole, the soldier meteorologists performed their novel duties with wonderful success. The weather service remained under military control until 1900, when the civilian Weather Bureau was established. "It is probable," the once familiar phrase of official weather prediction, has been superseded by one more formal and severe, "the indications are." "Old Probabilities" is succeeded by an organization comprising several hundred stations and a large corps of staff workers.

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WEATHER PARACHUTIST'S ASSOCIATION

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30 Years Ago —

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30 Years Ago —

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Dear Editor,

In the last edition of the Air Weather Association Newsletter, in an article by SSgt Steve Elliott, there was a request for stories related to weather forecasting for possible publication. I have one that I am unlikely to forget and which might amuse the readership. Here it is:

I arrived in Keesler Field, Mississippi, in September 1943 as a newly-minted second lieutenant from the meteorology course at MIT. I was assigned the midnight shift, probably because the Captain decided to minimize the amount of damage an untried forecaster could bring about. My first night on the job there was no air traffic at all, and after studying the weather map, I just sat around. At 4:00 AM the phone rang. It was the Officer of the Day who wanted to know what the uniform of the day should be. I told him that it looked like it was going to be a nice day and that khakis should be fine. There was a long pause followed by "Lieutenant, do you know it's raining now?" The troops wore raincoats that day and I can imagine the stories going around the Officer's Club that night.

Whether or not it was by design or chance I will never know, but that was one of the few forecasts I was destined to make. In a couple of weeks I was off to 8th Air Force Headquarters in England where I was assigned work in climatology, including the Normandy invasion.

- Don Cooke, Ithaca NY

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Dear Editor,

The article by General Senter in the last AWA Newsletter reminded me of my experiences in the Pacific at that time. I was one of eight weather forecasters in Det 55, 7th Weather Squadron on Tinian awaiting the arrival of the B-29 forces. The first B-29 raid from Saipan encountered various weather conditions such as an area of bad weather at the location where they had designated to form up the force after takeoff — and the target socked in when they got to Japan. I went over to the Weather Central on Saipan and suggested they send a weather forecaster out ahead of the main force to radio back and suggest rendezvous point B or C instead of A, and target B or C instead of A in case of bad weather conditions.

As a result, eight of us (seven from the weather unit on Tinian and Al Louchard from another unit) began flying. Lt. Alex Hamilton "Ham" Howard drew up a logo of a badger or something sitting astride a B-29, labeling us the "Fightin’ 55th". Incidentally, four of the eight were shot down and all luckily rescued — I was the fourth!

Please send me a copy of the Video "Forecast for Victory" and thanks for your efforts with the Newsletter.

- Jack Grantham, Pensacola FL

Ed. A picture on page 141 in John Fuller’s Thor’s Legions shows the 7WS officers who flew as observers on B-29 weather flights over Japan: Jasper E. "Jack" Grantham, Robert Moore, Alfred Louchard, Ham Howard, Jack Nielson, Dick Worthen, Edward A. Everts and Stan Kimball. (The picture was courtesy of Lestor Gaynor, 1945.)

Dear Editor,

Just a couple of short excerpts of stories I was involved in as a flight engineer with the 57th WRS out of Hickam AFB, Hawaii in 1957-58.

One of the Honolulu newspaper reporters had been hounding our commander, Lt. Col. John Conrad, to set him up on a flight into a hurricane or typhoon out of Hickam when we had one to track. We called on him to go along one evening as a neutral observer. We entered the northeast quadrant as per usual and before we even got to the eye, this man was so sick that I am sure he did not want to even think about going along a second time.

Another time, while we were deployed to Eniwetok in the Central Pacific on the atom bomb series in 1958, our squadron was asked to fill in for a SAC aircraft which had not arrived for a mission to fly through an atomic cloud after the shot was fired. We made the penetration as scheduled and returned to base where we were sent through the usual decontamination procedure. After our initial scrubdown all of the crew were considered safe except for Lt. Col. Conrad, who had to practically scrub the skin off his bald head several times before he was declared clean enough. He is still alive and living in Ft. Worth, Texas.

A third incident happened at Eniwetok during the shot series in 1958. None of our fly boys other than myself had been involved with the B-36 program so they knew nothing about the noise on take-off these monsters made. We had one arrive for a shot one day and no one paid much attention to it. The next morning our crews were all asleep in their tents which were just off to one side toward the end of the runway. This behemoth came roaring down for take-off about 4:30 AM with six recips and four jets turning. It was fully loaded as it would return to the States after the mission. You can imagine the consternation and confusion when people thought we had an aircraft crash which was coming right through our quarters. I had been with the initial B-36 program in 1949-51 and got a big kick out of the situation. - William J. Townsend, Port Townsend WA

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Dear Editor,

My Aviation Cadet Meteorology class was assembled about 3 March 1943 at the Boca Raton Country Club, Boca Raton, Florida. The night of our arrival, before being issued army uniforms, we stayed up late polishing the fire extinguishers in the hallways, because top brass were expected to do an inspection the next morning.

At Boca Raton we had one month basic training. I remember jogging to the beach, a 30 minute qualification with a .45 pistol, and a calculus refresher course. A weekend pass allowed a visit to a USO in Fort Lauderdale.

About 1 May we were shipped by railroad to Grand Rapids, Michigan. We were lined up on the railroad platform at Boca Raton for a Peter Parade, spent a day and half in the railroad coach, then were lined up for a Peter Parade on the station platform at Grand Rapids — some sort of army regulations. The Parade featured a medical officer jogging down the line with a flashlight in hand.

In Grand Rapids we occupied the entire Pantlin Hotel. Nearby streets were closed off giving us a "campus" and space for close order drill. There were two cadets per room and daily room inspections. I recall that the bristles on our tooth-brushes, displayed on our dresser tops, had to point a certain direction. After 54 years I forget whether it was left or right. We polished the chrome off the bathroom fixtures so we could polish the underlying brass. Rooms were maintained spotless — part of being a cadet.

Classes were held in a convention center and furniture exhibition hall nearby the Pantlin. One thousand cadets at 1,000 desks in one large room! I recall three eleven-week terms. The instruction was excellent. A tall, slender warrant officer who had much forecasting experience gave the principal lectures on synoptic meteorology. (Fuller’s Thor’s Legions pg. 52 mentions "CWO Andrew W. Weston, who inspired the troops to live and breathe meteorology as few others did.") Maps and charts were projected onto a movie screen. There was a Major Taylor on the staff who had published a textbook. I recall one instructor, Staff Sergeant Don Rulison, who walked among the desks supervising our chart work. An intriguing course was Single Station Weather Analysis.

My college sweetheart came by bus to Grand Rapids in June. We were married on a Sunday noon at the Wealthy Street Baptist Church nearby on a weekend pass. She rented a room in a private home and got a war-time job running a drill press in a Grand Rapids defense plant. All cadets were required to live in the hotel.

At the end of the second 11 weeks — it must have been September — the entire school, cadets, faculty, administration, moved from Grand Rapids to Chanute Field, Illinois for the final term. The moving week counted as our honeymoon. We visited the famous Moody Memorial Church in Chicago and explored the bookstores.

The town outside the Chanute gates was Rantoul, IL. It was so crowded with army wives that even the chicken coops were rented out. My wife got a job in the Post Exchange. I lived in the cadet barracks.

The course ended 28 November 1943 when the attached orders were cut. There are about 700 names on the list. We exchanged our cadet GI garb for officer’s uniforms newly shipped into the PX for the occasion The 300 who washed out, we understood, were trained as operations officers. Upon graduation we were given a week or so to meet my family. Everything we owned fit in one foot-locker (which is now the tool chest here in my garage). We traveled on to Army Air Base, Fort Dix, New Jersey where I remained until the war ended. (AAB Ft. Dix was later renamed McGuire Field). Most traffic was B-17’s and B-24’s enroute from the factory to Maine, then on to England.

My name on the attached orders is at the top of page 2, Buddy Yost Aunkst, which I changed in 1951 to Lloyd Henry Yost. I was too old for "Buddy." I still have every scrap of paper relating to my army experience, except my discharge; that accompanied an application for a GI mortgage in 1955.

- Lloyd H. Yost, Shrewsbury PA

Onetime 0-874510, MOS 8219

(The orders sent with this letter will be on display at the AWA 1998 reunion.)

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Dear Editor,

The enclosed appeared in the Sarasota Florida Herald Tribune on 4 August 1997. A great surprise!

With Thanks From Russia

Man given medal for job well done.
By Cody Vaughn-Birch (staff writer)

About 50 years ago, John Jamrich was a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army Air Corps watching for rain and snow in Alaska, helping Russian pilots get American planes to Siberia.

Last February, the Venice resident was awarded a medal by the Russian government for his work during World War II when Russia was receiving military aid from the U.S.

"I never expected (the medal)," said Jamrich. "It came right out of the blue."

Jamrich, former president of North Michigan University, served in Alaska from 1942 to 1946. After much Soviet urging, President Roosevelt agreed to aid Russia with the Lend-Lease program supplying aircraft to the Soviets via Alaska. Jamrich’s job was to forecast the weather for American and Russian pilots ferrying fighters, bombers and transport planes from Fairbanks to Siberia.

On July 25, 1945 Capt. J.X. Jamrich was commended by a Soviet officer for his "excellent" work as a weather forecaster. "His forecasts were distinguished by their accuracy and, for the most part, proved to be correct, " said Lt. Col. Zeiklin of the Red Army Air Forces.

Jamrich was awarded a bronze medal commemorating the 50th anniversary of Russia’s victory over Nazi Germany in World War II, or as it is known in Russia, the Great Patriotic War. Jamrich also received a certificate stamped with the Russian Federation seal and signed by Boris Yeltsin.

Jamrich’s interest in the weather dates back to his childhood. Between the ages of 2 and 9, Jamrich lived on a farm in Czechoslovakia and was often in charge of grazing the family livestock. Since the grazing area was over a mile away, weather conditions were a major concern and a watchful eye constantly had to be kept on the sky.

Jamrich’s curiosity of weather patterns continued in college. He studied meteorology and foreign languages at the University of Chicago. After graduation, Jamrich was commissioned as a 2nd lieutenant in the U.S. Army Air Corps. He expected to be assigned to the European Theater, but to his surprise he was ordered to Alaska.

Upon arrival in Alaska, his commanding officer discovered that Jamrich spoke several European languages, including Russian. The ability to speak Russian, combined with his meteorological training, made Jamrich the obvious choice to be the Weather Liaison Officer for the Soviet flight group, responsible for the weather forecasts for their flights from Fairbanks to Siberia.

Forecasting the weather between those sites was often difficult, said Jamrich. This was because the Russian meteorologists would not share information about the weather conditions in Siberia.

"Technically we were allies, but (the Russians) kept most of their data and observations a secret," he said.

The equipment Jamrich used to forecast the weather was usually little more than balloons and a barometer. These tools, combined with data collected from surrounding areas were all Jamrich had to forecast the weather for the long flight. Despite the limited technology, hundreds of planes were transferred during the Lend-Lease program and none was ever lost due to inaccurate weather forecasts.

There was little trust between the two countries during those times, and the Russians were very suspicious, said Jamrich. The planes would be flown to Alaska by American pilots, and then the aircraft would be checked over by American mechanics before handing them over to the Russians. When the Russians took the planes, they would have a crew of their own mechanics re-check the planes to make sure they were in good condition.

Jamrich spent much of his time with the Soviet pilots and found them to be highly educated and very intelligent. He remembers lengthy debates about politics and democracy. "The Russians thought they had a true democracy because they got to vote for their leaders," said Jamrich. "But when I asked how many candidates there were for each office, they would say, ‘One.’ "

Now Jamrich spends his time playing the piano and sharing his love of music with others. He performs at the Senior Friendship Center and has visited over 20 retirement homes in Sarasota County, where he likes to play classical music and tunes from the 30’s and 40’s.

Jamrich remembers those years during the war with fondness. Working with the Soviet pilots was extremely interesting and Jamrich considers the award a pleasant reminder of those distant memories.

- John X. Jamrich, Venice FL

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Dear Editor,

Air Weather Association members will enjoy reading the lead article in the EOS, Transactions, American Geophysical Union, Volume 78, Number 52, December 30, 1997. The title of the article is, " Norwegians Led the Way in Training Wartime Weather Officers" by Sheldon M. Levin. (The newspaper can be found in many libraries.)

- Larry Riddle, San Diego CA

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Dear Editor,

As promised, I am enclosing a copy of my paper on important weather forecasts, a copy of which is filed in the library of The Mighty Eighth Air Force Heritage Museum, here in Savannah. (The original 8th Air Force was organized here.) It seems to me that in the histories of World War II, very little is ever mentioned about the importance of weather forecasts to air operations — especially in that stormy area.

If you read my Oral History you will also note that we were successful in detecting the first nuclear explosion by the USSR. It was my specific assignment by the late Lt. Gen. Yates to set up the air testing laboratories along the west coast of Alaska. We completed the task just in time.

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IMPORTANT WEATHER FORECASTS FOR THE EIGHTH AIR FORCE

On 1 January 1944, the U.S. Strategic Air Forces in Europe (USSTAF) were formed under then Lt. Gen. Carl Spaatz to plan and direct the operation of the AAF heavy bombers based in the UK and Italy, the 8th and the 15th Air Forces respectively. Lt. Gen. (then Col. Yates) was placed in charge of the weather section in USSTAF to support this effort. His staff included Brig. Gen. (then Lt. Col.) Holzman, Dr. (then Lt. Col.) Irving Krick, formerly the head of meteorology at Cal. Tech., and other selected forecasters.

Prior to the organization of USSTAF, General of the Army George Marshall reported "Large scale daylight raids require unlimited ceilings for precise aiming from high altitudes. Days of unlimited ceilings are rare in Europe, and the development of weather forecasting became a matter of extreme importance."

On 17 February 1944, the command and operation elements of USSTAF were briefed by Lt. Col. Krick. He stated that beginning 20 February there would be at least three days of clear weather over Leipzig and other desired German targets. General Spaatz ordered the 8th and 15th Air Forces to prepare during the 3 days before the 20th. Actually there were 5 days of visual bombing opportunities beginning on the 20th.

Much has been written about those 5 days when up to 2000 heavy bombers from the UK and Italy, with fighter escorts, attacked German factories in daylight. General of the Army Arnold said, "Those five days changed the history of the air war." [Ed. This was Operation Argument and often referred to as "Big Week."] After the February offensive the allies made wide ranging attacks against the German targets, and especially continued to hammer the Luftwaffe. Within weeks, it was no longer an effective force.

General Arnold knew Col. Krick before the war, having visited him at Cal. Tech. Where Dr. Krick and his meteorology unit taught forecasting. Brig. Gen. Holzman was one of his many students. Gen. Arnold got him commissioned in the AAF. Col. Krick was trusted by Gen. Arnold and Gen. Spaatz.

The forecast for the D-Day invasion, involved concerns of agencies involved in shipping as to winds, tides, beach obstacles, etc., as well as Air Force concerns for aircraft. Again the Krick-Holzman forecast team predicted a period that permitted the invasion. (Many other meteorologists were involved, some dissenting, but the Krick-Holzman forecast, with support from Gen. Spaatz prevailed). Contrary forecasts by German forecasters, to the effect that an invasion during that period would be impossible, greatly relaxed German defenses.

Contributions by Col. (then Capt.) Robert Bundgaard and his upper air group were also important to the forecasts.

[Ed. See Fuller’s Thor’s Legions pgs. 85-100 and Bates & Fuller’s America’s Weather Warriors for an more complete review of the outlooks and forecasts of weather for the D-Day Invasion and the people involved.]

The excellence of American forecasts can be explained in large part by an action taken during the 1942-43 period. At that time I was a member of the Joint Meteorological Committee, an agency of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. General Yates, after much persuasion, got an agreement to produce 40 years (1899-1940) of daily weather maps of the Northern Hemisphere—a decision that may have been aided by a conversation between Dr. Krick and General Arnold. The decision required a major effort. The files on record, especially those of the U.S. Weather Bureau, had to be researched and the data collated to permit showing reports from all stations at the same time.

Finally, the weather maps had to be drawn. Thus it became possible to show atmospheric and weather conditions as they existed simultaneously, by synoptic maps. The final work was done at NYU and at Cal Tech.

Many copies of these 40-year maps were printed and distributed. They gave forecasters the opportunity to search for and possibly find situations similar to "Today’s Weather" or analogues. Development of weather systems and events in the analogues gave strong clues as to likely developments in the current situation. They were very helpful in making good forecasts.

In the above, the quotes from Generals Marshall and Arnold are from: General of the Army George Marshall, The Biennial Report, Chief of Staff, U.S. Army to the Secretary of War, 1 July 1941–30 June 1943. And, General of the Army H. H. Arnold, The Second Report to The Secretary of War, 27 February 1945.

Recommended reading for those interested is the publication Some Meteorological Aspects of the D-Day Invasion of Europe. It contains the proceedings of a symposium at Ft. Ord, California on 19 May 1984, sponsored by 4 California chapters of the American Meteorological Society.

I am grateful to Freeman R. Smith who sent important material from his California home.

- Lewis L. Mundell, Lt. Gen. USAF (Ret.), Savannah, GA

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Bob Bundgaard, always interested in historical events, sent the following for the AWA files. It was in the Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph, 27 July 1995, by Todd Hegert in a series commemorating the 50th anniversary of the end of World War II.

War Need Overcame Politics

In war, the enemy of your enemy is often your friend. That’s how Robert "Oz" Osborne explains his honorary-membership in the Chinese Communist Party and army.

Bob Osborne [an AWA member] was a weatherman with the 10th Weather Squadron in the China-Burma-India theater. Toward the end of the war, the United States was flying bombing raids on Japan from bases in China, and weather information was desperately needed.

Osborne’s unit was invited to put in a weather station in an area of northern China controlled by the Chinese Communists. They arrived in the mountains near what is now Yan’an and set up in a labyrinth of caves that served as Communist Party headquarters.

"We were treated as very special people — there weren’t many Americans around," says Osborne. As a token of friendship, he was made an honorary member of the Chinese Communist Party and given a Chinese Communist Army uniform.

He remembers having dinner one night with Zhou Enlai. But he didn’t realize the historical significance at the time. He just knew that he had been relegated to dine with a lesser party member, while his boss had dinner with a man named Mao.

Osborne kept the story to himself after the war — especially during the anti-Communist fervor of the 1950s. "I didn’t talk about it for years, and I destroyed my communist army uniform. During the McCarthy era, it was scary."

There are many stories only recently coming to light from WW II especially about China. Bill Tazewell, the "Father of the AWA Internet website" and now "Webmaster Emeritus," "the Patriarch of the Internet" and a charter member of the USAAF weather service (enlisting in 1937), has been researching the life of Lt Col Douglas S. Mackiernan. He was in charge of the 10WS unit at Tihwa (probably the remotest, but a very important site) and stayed in China after the war employed by the US Consul & CIA. Bill has his notes on the Internet which can be accessed through the AWA site, http://www.geocities.com/Pentagon/2695. Joe Tucker found historically significant data on Capt Carl E. Rimmele.

 

Captain CARL EDWARD RIMMELE (1921– 1945)

by Joe Tucker, Col USAF (Ret.), Spanaway WA

I was talking to one of our substitute priests at McChord AFB after mass back in May 1997. After finding out I had been in Air Weather Service, he told me about his brother Capt. Carl Rimmele, a forecaster who had died in a Japanese prison camp in World War II. Knowing a little about AWS history I was apprehensive as I had never heard of a Capt. Rimmele, specifically as a weather forecaster, who had died in a prison camp. So, when I visited HQ AWS, I stopped by the Historian’s office and they could find nothing; but, indicated they would like me to find out anything I could. Col. Dushan (then AWS/CC) also asked me to follow up. On my return home, I talked to Father Leo and found out that Capt. Rimmele got his weather training at UCLA on a Army contract program following his graduation from Loyola University and subsequent entry into the Army. In the package of correspondence from Fr. Leo Rimmele was letters, telegrams and pictures I forwarded to Col Hayes at HQ AFWA with copies to AWA. In summary —

Capt Carl E. Rimmele was born in Holly, California on 2 April 1921, graduated from Loyola High School and Loyola University and joined the USAAF. He was a USAAF weather officer at an unknown base in China supporting the 341st Bombardment Group, 14th Air Force. The next dated correspondence is a June 1945 telegram to Carl’s Mother in Los Angeles regretfully informing her that Carl has been missing in action in French Indo-China since 29 May 1945. A letter followed providing more details.

Wendelin Moore, the base Catholic Chaplain also wrote to Carl’s Mother at the suggestion of Lt Schilling (Carl’s replacement), stating, "The only reason Carl was flying on that mission was because he is so conscientious and earnest about his work. He believed he could predict the weather more accurately if he actually saw the weather conditions over the enemy targets. So for this reason he voluntarily flew on many missions. You already know, I suppose, that he received the Air Medal sometime ago for these flights (he had over 150 hours of ‘volunteer’ combat flying). Because of this conscientiousness and earnestness he is admittedly about the best Weather Man in China. Everyone had absolute faith in his judgment.

He often risked his life in going on these missions when it was not strictly required of him. But by so doing, he was able to predict the weather more accurately and undoubtedly by risking his own life in this way, he saved the lives of many others by his accuracy and made our missions more effective. That was the highest degree of charity and devotion to duty. But that’s Carl. The men appreciate this and are united with you in hoping and praying he returns safely. "

After seven months of waiting and reading updated letters from many officers including Maj. Gen Chennault and General Spaatz, Mrs Rimmele received a telegram in February 1946, regretfully informing her that Carl had died in a prison camp on 30 June 1945. The letter that followed informed her that, "Carl was the weather officer on a plane which left this base at 9:35 in the morning of May 29 to attack enemy objectives along the railroad paralleling the coastline of French Indo-China in the vicinity of Vinh (18° 39’N – 105° 40’E). The plane was not heard from following its departure from this base, flying in the direction of the target.

An official report, based upon information secured by a China Search Detachment, states that your son was captured by the Japanese on 6 June 1945, near Thanhhoa, French Indo-China and taken to Hanoi, French Indo-China, where he died of malaria on 30 June 1945. His body was recovered from a public cemetery and will be reinterred in Shanghai, China. The Quartermaster General, Washington 25, D.C., has jurisdiction over matters pertaining to the burial of the military personnel who die overseas and any inquiry you may have regarding the location of your son’s grave may be addressed to that official."

AWA members and Unit/Squadron representatives who want to publicize their activities and historical information can mail materials to the AWA Newsletter Editor, 6704 Wolke Court, Montgomery AL 36116-2134. The information will be displayed at the AWA Reunion and published in the next Newsletter and/or on the Internet AWA home page as appropriate.

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1997 AF WEATHER AWARD WINNERS

 

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BGEN KELLY APPOINTED NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DIRECTOR

On 20 February 1998, US Department of Commerce Secretary William M. Daley announced the appointment of Air Force Brigadier General John J. Kelly Jr. (Ret.) as the 13th Director of the National Weather Service. "I have every confidence that General Kelly's experience and expertise will be of great benefit to the weather service, particularly as we near the end of its modernization program," said Secretary Daley. "I am fully committed to ensuring we have the best weather service in the world. I am confident that General Kelly — with the support of the 5,000 dedicated National Weather Service employees — will provide just that."

"General Kelly joins the weather service at a critical time when serious concerns about sound fiscal management and systems development efforts have been raised," said Secretary Daley. "His past experience, strong leadership, and management ability are well suited to meet the challenges facing the National Weather Service in the 21st century."

"I am honored to be selected as the Director of the National Weather Service," said General Kelly. "I look forward to maintaining the high level of quality service the public has come to expect from this agency."

Jack Kelly (19th Commander of AWS) assumed his duties as NWS Director on February 26th. He will be responsible for completing the modernization of the National Weather Service, ensuring its cost-effective and efficient operation, and maintaining the quality of daily weather forecasts and warnings. He will also be responsible for maintaining strong working relationships, not only with the academic community and private sector, but also with Congress and state and local governments.

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MORE MEMBER NEWS

Dr. Elbert W. "Joe" Friday, Col USAF (Ret.) previous Director of the National Weather Service was appointed as NOAA Assistant Administrator for Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) on 30 June 1997. He is internationally known as the architect of the NWS Modernization Plan that brought Doppler radar (NEXRAD), GOES, ASOS, AWIPS and many other technological and scientific advances to weather observing, analysis and forecasting.

The American Meteorological Society announced the results of recent elections and their President-Elect for 1998 is George L. Frederick Jr., Col USAF (Ret.), a Project Manager and Senior Staff Scientist at Radian International LLC, Meteorological Systems in Austin, Texas. George retired from a 30-yr career in the US Air Force in 1993; his last position was Commander of the Air Weather Service. He was the National Weather Association President-Elect in 1985 and President in 1986. Congratulations George! — First to be elected President of both the NWA and AMS.

Elected as a Councilor of the AMS was Colonel John L. Hayes, Commander of the Air Force Weather Agency, Offutt AFB, Nebraska. He recently served as a Councilor of the National Weather Association (96-97).

Dr. Thomas D. Potter, Col USAF (Ret.), former Vice-Commander of the AWS, is on the AMS Council and was designated as an Alumni Fellow by Penn State University, the highest award given to alumni for professional accomplishments. Tom is the Regional Director of the National Weather Service Western Region, comprised of the eight western states in the CONUS. The President of the United States designated Tom as a ‘Meritorious Executive for sustained superior performance in the management of programs of the US Government and for noteworthy achievement of quality and efficiency of the public service.’ He recently underwent heart bypass surgery and is recuperating well. Best wishes Tom for a speedy and full recovery!

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CELEBRATION OF THE 50TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE FIRST TORNADO FORECAST
Tinker Air Force Base and Norman, OK
23-25 March 1998

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CELEBRATION OF THE 50TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE FIRST TORNADO FORECAST
Tinker Air Force Base and Norman, OK
23-25 March 1998

In the evening of 25 March 1948, a tornado roared through Tinker Air Force Base (AFB), Oklahoma, causing considerable damage, a few injuries, but no fatalities. However, the destruction could have been much worse. A few hours earlier Air Force Captain Robert C. Miller and Major Ernest J. Fawbush correctly predicted that atmospheric conditions were ripe for tornadoes in the vicinity of Tinker AFB.

This first official tornado forecast was instrumental in advancing the nation's commitment to protecting the American public and military resources from the dangers caused by natural hazards.

On 23-25 March 1998, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Weather Service, National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL), in cooperation with the University of Oklahoma and the Air Force will host an extended celebration in Norman, Oklahoma, and at nearby Tinker AFB as a tribute to the 50 years of tornado forecasting.

This celebration will recognize the milestones in tornado forecasting over the past half-century, including the rapid advancements in severe weather watches and warnings that have been realized during the past few years with the new WSR-88D Doppler radars, interactive computer systems and other modernization programs.

The Golden Anniversary Celebration will also highlight the exciting future which lies ahead from better scientific understanding and integration of rapidly advancing computer and communication systems into operational meteorological forecasting.

The following events are being planned to celebrate the occasion:

Monday, 23 March - NOAA will host an Open House at its facilities in Norman, Oklahoma.

Tuesday, 24 March - The local chapters of the American Meteorological Society and the National Weather Association will sponsor a scientific symposium at the University of Oklahoma. Ten internationally-recognized scientists will deliver invited presentations on topics ranging from tornado forecasting techniques and future activities of the NWS Storm Prediction Center, to the history of storm and tornado intercept efforts. In addition, a tribute to Air Force Colonel (Retired) Robert C. Miller will be paid by Dr. Robert Maddox, who will also discuss the first tornado forecast of Miller and Fawbush. Additional information is on the Internet at http://www.nssl.noaa.gov/GoldenAnniversary/symposium,

Wednesday, 25 March - All of the sponsors will host a special ceremony to dedicate a historical marker at Tinker AFB to commemorate the first tornado forecast.

Other events associated with the celebration include:

- Participation by the U.S. Postal Service by issuing a canceled post card.

- Participation by schools in Oklahoma through essay and poster contests on tornado safety.

- Fly-over by airplanes from Tinker AFB.

- A special edition of the technical journal Weather and Forecasting highlighting advances in severe weather forecasting.

Ed. Lt Col Ernest J. Fawbush died in El Paso, Texas in November 1982. He was survived by two daughters who are being invited to the celebration. Colonel Robert C. Miller lives in Laurel, Maryland and suffers from Parkinson’s disease. His wife Beverly sent word that Bob enjoys hearing from friends and appreciates that this celebration is being planned. Bob & Ernie — Thanks for your smart work and for bringing great credit to AF Weather!

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Jim DeCarufel, The New AWA Webmaster

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Jim DeCarufel, The New AWA Webmaster

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AWA Board of Directors needs your help!

This year, the AWA Board of Directors is looking for a volunteer for the AWA Locator position. Yes, Freeman R. Smith is looking for relief. The AWA Locator maintains the computer database of members now numbering over 4,500 and growing. The data is kept on SuperWorks, but we are looking into converting to a more modern system that is barcode capable, easier to use and maintain, etc.

Once a year, the Locator prints out the database for the Roster and prepares mailing labels. The Locator also answers requests for information from members and non-members. Some may be looking for individuals that were assigned with them years ago.

The volunteer would need computer resources and e-mail capability. AWA Board members and other volunteers do not receive compensation for their work. However, expenses for mailing correspondence and buying supplies necessary to carry out the requirements of the jobs will normally be reimbursed out of Association funds.

Any member that is interested, please call Freeman Smith for further details (see the Roster front cover). Freeman will be at the June 1998 Reunion and can discuss details with anyone then. Thanks in advance for your consideration.

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AWA Newsletter

Editor: J. Kevin Lavin

Published at least annually by Kevin & Carol Lavin, Air Weather Association, 6704 Wolke Court, Montgomery, Alabama 36116-2134.

Tel/FAX: (334) 213-0388

e-mail: AirWeaAssn@aol.com

Subscription rates: Free to Air Weather Association members as part of their lifetime membership and complimentary to AF Weather units.

Submit newsletter items directly to the Editor for publication in the next edition or for the AWA Home Page: http://www.airweaassn.org

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